Art Deco Architecture

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78 notes &

Cloud Study of Chrysler Building, ca. 1930by Samuel H. Gottscho
From the Museum of the City of New York’s photo collections. Available as a print via the MCNY online shop. 
Description:

Samuel H. Gottscho Cloud Study of Chrysler Building, ca. 1930Southwest view from the 26th floor of the River House at East 52nd St. The Chrysler Building and Empire State Building are visible. 

Samuel H. Gottscho (1875-1971 was an American architectural, landscape, and nature photographer. His portraits and architectural photography regularly appeared in articles in the New York Times. Approximately 29,000 of his images are held in the Gottscho-Schleisner collection at the U. S. Library of Congress. Additionally, over 40,000 are held by the Museum of the City of New York, where an exhibition of his work titled “The Mythic City: Photographs of New York by Samuel H. Gottscho, 1925-1940,” opened in November 2005. A third major archive of his work is held by Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library at Columbia University.
P.S. Want to be blown away, search Google Images for “Samuel H. Gottscho.”

Cloud Study of Chrysler Building, ca. 1930
by Samuel H. Gottscho

From the Museum of the City of New York’s photo collections. Available as a print via the MCNY online shop

Description:

Samuel H. Gottscho 
Cloud Study of Chrysler Building, ca. 1930
Southwest view from the 26th floor of the River House at East 52nd St. The Chrysler Building and Empire State Building are visible. 

Samuel H. Gottscho (1875-1971 was an American architectural, landscape, and nature photographer. His portraits and architectural photography regularly appeared in articles in the New York Times. Approximately 29,000 of his images are held in the Gottscho-Schleisner collection at the U. S. Library of Congress. Additionally, over 40,000 are held by the Museum of the City of New York, where an exhibition of his work titled “The Mythic City: Photographs of New York by Samuel H. Gottscho, 1925-1940,” opened in November 2005. A third major archive of his work is held by Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library at Columbia University.

P.S. Want to be blown away, search Google Images for “Samuel H. Gottscho.”

Filed under chrylser building new york city nyc manhattan samuel gottscho skyline 1930s art deco gotham architectur

48 notes &

Another item from my blog email, which I clearly need to check more often.
The email, from marketing staff at the publisher, begins:

I am pleased to announce the release of William Alan Morrison’s pictorial history book Waldorf Astoria from Arcadia Publishing. Set to be published on Monday, April 14, 2014, this new title connects people to the history of the iconic New York City hotel through stunning vintage images. We would be honored to have this new book featured on your website to help spread the word about its release!

From the press releases that was attached:

Waldorf Astoria’s History Showcased in New BookStunning, vintage images highlight history of the prominent NYC hotelDiscover the history of an iconic New York hotel in Arcadia Publishing’s new addition Images of America: Waldorf Astoria from author William Alan Morrison. The book boasts more than 200 images of the hotel throughout its history.This new pictorial history honors the world-renown Waldorf Astoria, which is quite simply the grandest of all grand hotels. Vintage images take readers on a journey through the magnificent history of the hotel and the many glamorous guests that it housed.  The Waldorf Astoria has been host to emperors, rajahs, potentates and plutocrats—not to mention every US president since Grover Cleveland—its name has become synonymous with the epitome of glamour, luxury and sophistication. Author William Alan Morrison shares information on how the name Waldorf Astoria applied to two different but equally magnificent hotels. The first was the connecting Hotel Waldorf and Astoria Hotel operating at the corner of Fifth Avenue and West Thirty-third Street. It was a Gilded Age pleasure dome created by the Astor family for New York’s social elite. The second and present Waldorf Astoria on Park Avenue is the ultimate expression of Gotham’s Jazz Age extravagance. Vintage photographs herein record the architecture, decoration and history of these two extraordinary establishments as well as the outsized personalities who created and dwelt within them.Available at area bookstores, independent retailers, and online retailers, or through Arcadia Publishing at (888)-313-2665 or online.  Arcadia Publishing is the leading publisher of local and regional history in the United States.  Our mission is to make history accessible and meaningful through the publication of books on the heritage of America’s people and places.  Have we done a book on your town?  Visit http://www.arcadiapublishing.com.

The book can be ordered directly form Arcadia’s web site but like most Images of America books, you can find it on Amazon, order from a bookstore, and it’s probably stocked in places like Museum of the City of New York.
Wendy

Another item from my blog email, which I clearly need to check more often.

The email, from marketing staff at the publisher, begins:

I am pleased to announce the release of William Alan Morrison’s pictorial history book Waldorf Astoria from Arcadia Publishing. Set to be published on Monday, April 14, 2014, this new title connects people to the history of the iconic New York City hotel through stunning vintage images. We would be honored to have this new book featured on your website to help spread the word about its release!

From the press releases that was attached:

Waldorf Astoria’s History Showcased in New Book
Stunning, vintage images highlight history of the prominent NYC hotel

Discover the history of an iconic New York hotel in Arcadia Publishing’s new addition Images of America: Waldorf Astoria from author William Alan Morrison. The book boasts more than 200 images of the hotel throughout its history.

This new pictorial history honors the world-renown Waldorf Astoria, which is quite simply the grandest of all grand hotels. Vintage images take readers on a journey through the magnificent history of the hotel and the many glamorous guests that it housed.  The Waldorf Astoria has been host to emperors, rajahs, potentates and plutocrats—not to mention every US president since Grover Cleveland—its name has become synonymous with the epitome of glamour, luxury and sophistication.

Author William Alan Morrison shares information on how the name Waldorf Astoria applied to two different but equally magnificent hotels. The first was the connecting Hotel Waldorf and Astoria Hotel operating at the corner of Fifth Avenue and West Thirty-third Street. It was a Gilded Age pleasure dome created by the Astor family for New York’s social elite. The second and present Waldorf Astoria on Park Avenue is the ultimate expression of Gotham’s Jazz Age extravagance. Vintage photographs herein record the architecture, decoration and history of these two extraordinary establishments as well as the outsized personalities who created and dwelt within them.

Available at area bookstores, independent retailers, and online retailers, or through Arcadia Publishing at (888)-313-2665 or online. 

Arcadia Publishing is the leading publisher of local and regional history in the United States.  Our mission is to make history accessible and meaningful through the publication of books on the heritage of America’s people and places.  Have we done a book on your town?  Visit http://www.arcadiapublishing.com.

The book can be ordered directly form Arcadia’s web site but like most Images of America books, you can find it on Amazon, order from a bookstore, and it’s probably stocked in places like Museum of the City of New York.

Wendy

Filed under waldorf astoria waldorf-astoria waldorf-astoria hotel nyc new york city manhattan nyc history new york history images of america

91 notes &

Recently a new book came out on Hildreth Meière, the artist behind such familiar NYC architectural ornaments and murals as this medallion on the front of Radio City Music Hall (photo: NY Times). Since The Art Deco Murals of Hildreth Meière was published, several articles have appeared. Below are handy links:
"If These Walls Could Speak, They’d Say Her Name" (NY Times)
"Art Deco New York" (NY Times slide show)
"The Best Art Deco Designer Who Almost No One Remembers" (The Atlantic)
"New book highlights work of female Art Deco muralist" (AP)
And before you ask, no, I hadn’t heard of her either, although surely there are those of you who follow this blog who have.
Additional links:
Wikipedia: Hildreth Meière
Hildreth Meiere Official Website
Goodreads: The Art Deco Murals of Hildreth Meiere 
Self-portrait, 1943
The book is on my wish list now.
Wendy

Recently a new book came out on Hildreth Meière, the artist behind such familiar NYC architectural ornaments and murals as this medallion on the front of Radio City Music Hall (photo: NY Times). Since The Art Deco Murals of Hildreth Meière was published, several articles have appeared. Below are handy links:

And before you ask, no, I hadn’t heard of her either, although surely there are those of you who follow this blog who have.

Additional links:

The book is on my wish list now.

Wendy

Filed under hildreth meière art deco architecture nyc new york city nyc architecture new york architecture radio city music hall design art history hildreth meiere muralist history of design female artist female designer women's history

90 notes &

U… United States
Chrysler Building, NYC, New YorkPhoto by Rex Maxmilian
For the “United States” photo, I went with a biggie and also a photo I hadn’t come across before — a stunning shot!
Here’s the background of the shot (from Jan. 2013), as given by the photographer on Flickr:

- - G O T H A M - -
After 2500 photos (up to this point) in 4 days in New York City, and after walking several miles with several pounds of gear, I was exhausted, (to put it mildly). Having just had dinner with my cousin on our last night there around 11:30pm, we were headed back to the hotel. It was very cold and very foggy out and I was really looking forward to four or five hours of sleep in a warm, comfy bed before cabbing it to the airport at 6am. I glanced down 42nd Street from Times Square just to get one last glimpse from far away of my all-time favorite NYC building…
The Chrysler Building!
 The night, the lights, the fog… it was just too magical to pass up—even after having shot it on two separate occasions earlier in the trip. Right then I knew, I would get very little sleep. So, back to the room to get my gear and off into the night I went…
I took around 300 photos between 12:30-2:30am. This particular one was right across the street (on 42nd) from Grand Central Station. Aside from a slight saturation bump and tone level adjustments, this is pretty much what it looked like S.O.O.C. (straight out of camera).
To me, I could just imagine Batman perched atop the building in the lower-right of the frame overlooking the city… hence naming the photo —GOTHAM—
 More to come!
…oh, and, HAPPY NEW YEAR !!!
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Gear used: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM with 2x III Extender, TripodSettings: 13 sec. exposure, f/11, ISO 50, 210mm, Mirror lockup, 2 sec. timer shutter releaseFile name: NYC 20130113-2629 (5D2_1122)Location: 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue, New York, New York, USA

U… United States

Chrysler Building, NYC, New York
Photo by Rex Maxmilian

For the “United States” photo, I went with a biggie and also a photo I hadn’t come across before — a stunning shot!

Here’s the background of the shot (from Jan. 2013), as given by the photographer on Flickr:

- - G O T H A M - -

After 2500 photos (up to this point) in 4 days in New York City, and after walking several miles with several pounds of gear, I was exhausted, (to put it mildly). Having just had dinner with my cousin on our last night there around 11:30pm, we were headed back to the hotel. It was very cold and very foggy out and I was really looking forward to four or five hours of sleep in a warm, comfy bed before cabbing it to the airport at 6am. I glanced down 42nd Street from Times Square just to get one last glimpse from far away of my all-time favorite NYC building…

The Chrysler Building!

 The night, the lights, the fog… it was just too magical to pass up—even after having shot it on two separate occasions earlier in the trip. Right then I knew, I would get very little sleep. So, back to the room to get my gear and off into the night I went…

I took around 300 photos between 12:30-2:30am. This particular one was right across the street (on 42nd) from Grand Central Station. Aside from a slight saturation bump and tone level adjustments, this is pretty much what it looked like S.O.O.C. (straight out of camera).

To me, I could just imagine Batman perched atop the building in the lower-right of the frame overlooking the city… hence naming the photo —GOTHAM—

 More to come!

…oh, and, HAPPY NEW YEAR !!!

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Gear used: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM with 2x III Extender, Tripod
Settings: 13 sec. exposure, f/11, ISO 50, 210mm, Mirror lockup, 2 sec. timer shutter release
File name: NYC 20130113-2629 (5D2_1122)
Location: 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue, New York, New York, USA

Filed under chrysler building nyc new york city manhattan photography architectural photography architecture art deco 1930s