Art Deco Architecture

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40 notes &

Fox Theatre, Atlanta, Georgia
Photo by Wendy Darling

Shots of the “sky” and palace ramparts of the theater, taken from the balcony. The stars actually twinkle and the clouds (shown in one picture) move across, thanks to a special light with a rotating disc on it. At one time the sky also did “sunrise” and “sunset” effects. Those ramparts, BTW, are walkable, and we saw staff up on them. As for those huge chandeliers hanging from the proscenium, a cherry picker is using for replacing bulbs and maintenance. 

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58 notes &

Fox Theatre, Atlanta, Georgia
Photo by Wendy Darling

A couple examples of the over-the-top “Moorish” architecture found throughout the theater complex. The architecture, who was French, had never seen any such architecture in person and based his designs entirely on books, drawings, photos, lithographs, etc. (Same for all the Egyptian style rooms.) 

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44 notes &

Fox Theatre, Atlanta, Georgia
Photo by Wendy Darling

The Fox seats over 4,000, meaning they have to keep over 4,000 seats up and running, with spiffy upholstery true to the original design. They’re pretty comfy seats, I’ve found. These are seats on the orchestra level. If the light was better you could see the details on the ends of the rows.

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60 notes &

Fox Theatre, Atlanta, Georgia
Photos by Wendy Darling

The magnificent interior of the Fox Theatre. Originally designed by the regional Shriners organization to be a massive headquarters, with theater, meeting rooms, etc., after they basically bankrupted themselves having it building, William Fox stepped in and made a deal to run it as a movie palace, while allowing the Shriners to use the meeting rooms, etc., and main auditorium as needed.

A few notes on these photos: The style of the 4,000 seat theater (with huge orchestra level and even bigger balcony) is Moorish / North African fantasy. It’s designed to give the feeling you’re in the courtyard of an exotic castle, with ramparts all around, an open sky (with twinkling stars and clouds that move), a tent roof hanging over one side, etc. Meanwhile the two large boxes/balconies on each side of the stage aren’t functional for people but are designed to screen the pipes of the massive (3000+ pipe) theater organ, plus other organ gear likes drums, xylophone, thunder machine, etc. (used for silent movie sound effects). 

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44 notes &

Fox Theatre, Atlanta, GeorgiaPhoto by Wendy Darling
Yesterday I went on a tour of one of my most favorite Atlanta buildings / institutions, the Fabulous Fox Theatre, with my mother, who is visiting from out of town. I have been to many performances at the theater, roamed around as much as possible (before and after the show, at intermission) and have researched it for posts on this blog, but had never done a tour. It was a great tour —  learned even more and saw several areas I’d never seen before, including normally private areas.
Anyway, while it’s only partially Art Deco (it opened in 1929), and mostly alternating Moorish & Egyptian style (thanks to the Shriners), since I’ve got the pictures, and we’re talking fantastic 1920s movie palace architecture, I thought I’d share them here. Besides, I’m about to go out of town (to Savannah) with my mom for a few days, so I need something to post, don’t I?
-Wendy 

Fox Theatre, Atlanta, Georgia
Photo by Wendy Darling

Yesterday I went on a tour of one of my most favorite Atlanta buildings / institutions, the Fabulous Fox Theatre, with my mother, who is visiting from out of town. I have been to many performances at the theater, roamed around as much as possible (before and after the show, at intermission) and have researched it for posts on this blog, but had never done a tour. It was a great tour — learned even more and saw several areas I’d never seen before, including normally private areas.

Anyway, while it’s only partially Art Deco (it opened in 1929), and mostly alternating Moorish & Egyptian style (thanks to the Shriners), since I’ve got the pictures, and we’re talking fantastic 1920s movie palace architecture, I thought I’d share them here. Besides, I’m about to go out of town (to Savannah) with my mom for a few days, so I need something to post, don’t I?

-Wendy 

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27 notes &

SIFF Cinema Egyptian, Seattle, Washingtonvia Seattle Times
I can’t resist a movie theater renovation story, and here’s a nice one out of Seattle.
From the Seattle Times: 

The newest chapter in the almost century-long Egyptian Theatre story begins this week. A former Masonic temple now owned by Seattle Central College, the ornate Capitol Hill single-screen movie palace closed its doors last year, when Landmark Theatres ended a 24-year occupancy. Now it has a new life: The Seattle International Film Festival — which made its home at the Egyptian [renamed SIFF Cinema Egyptian) back in the 1980s — has taken over the lease, and reopens its doors this weekend with a gala celebration…
…Though the Egyptian won’t look too different to the casual eye, SIFF has given it a face-lift for its new incarnation: new sound equipment (long a problem in the old Egyptian), new speakers and amplifiers, a restored 35mm projector along with digital projection equipment, electrical and heating/ventilation/air conditioning updates, a freshening-up of the concessions area (which now serves beer on tap, as well as wine), better lighting and paint touch-ups to the elaborate, Egyptian-themed décor.

SIFF Cinema Egyptian, Seattle, Washington
via Seattle Times

I can’t resist a movie theater renovation story, and here’s a nice one out of Seattle.

From the Seattle Times:

The newest chapter in the almost century-long Egyptian Theatre story begins this week. A former Masonic temple now owned by Seattle Central College, the ornate Capitol Hill single-screen movie palace closed its doors last year, when Landmark Theatres ended a 24-year occupancy. Now it has a new life: The Seattle International Film Festival — which made its home at the Egyptian [renamed SIFF Cinema Egyptian) back in the 1980s — has taken over the lease, and reopens its doors this weekend with a gala celebration…

…Though the Egyptian won’t look too different to the casual eye, SIFF has given it a face-lift for its new incarnation: new sound equipment (long a problem in the old Egyptian), new speakers and amplifiers, a restored 35mm projector along with digital projection equipment, electrical and heating/ventilation/air conditioning updates, a freshening-up of the concessions area (which now serves beer on tap, as well as wine), better lighting and paint touch-ups to the elaborate, Egyptian-themed décor.

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52 notes &

Odeon Cinema, Sydney, Australia
via Daily Telegraph

Photo from a feature on a one-screen theater in Sydney — quite a survivor. It reminds me of the Plaza Theatre here in Atlanta.

From the article:

In a world where bigger is better, one of Sydney’s humblest, smallest cinemas is proving the exception to the rule.

Hornsby’s 490-seat Odeon Cinema, the only single-screen cinema left in Sydney, marks its 100th year this year.

Manager David Stone says the secret to the art-deco cinema’s success is “knowing your audience”.

“You have to pick the right film every time, especially when you’ve only got one screen,” he said.

The Odeon opened on the Pacific Hwy in 1914 as ‘Hornsby Cinema’ with the foyer on street level and the big screen likely featuring some of Charlie Chaplin’s finest work.

It was rebuilt in 1921 and again in the 1930s when art deco was at the forefront of building design.

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