Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

Posts tagged modern architecture

39 notes &

S… Stuttgart
Stuttgart, GermanyPhoto by William Boulay
Not Deco, but 1920s Modernism and eminently shareable, I think. Architect: Hans Scharoun.
From Flickr:

Weissenhof Estage (estate of working class housing which was built in Stuttgart in 1927. It was an international showcase of what later became known as the International style of modern architecture.)

More about Weissenhof Estate here.

S… Stuttgart

Stuttgart, Germany
Photo by William Boulay

Not Deco, but 1920s Modernism and eminently shareable, I think. Architect: Hans Scharoun.

From Flickr:

Weissenhof Estage (estate of working class housing which was built in Stuttgart in 1927. It was an international showcase of what later became known as the International style of modern architecture.)

More about Weissenhof Estate here.

Filed under stuttgart germany hans scharoun modernism modern architecture international style weissenhof estate

18 notes &

P… Pakistan
Lahore, PakistanPhoto by Iqbal Allam
Examples of late Deco / 60s Modern.
Photographer’s note:

India and Pakistan saw an upsurge of Art-Deco style housing in 50s. Some houses were built on large enough plots to house subsequent generations living side by side in contemporary houses.
This plot houses three spacious individual houses with generous gardens.
More on Private Housing and architecture in Lahore was covered in my Blog here: http://iqbalaalam.wordpress.com/category/lahore/

P… Pakistan

Lahore, Pakistan
Photo by Iqbal Allam

Examples of late Deco / 60s Modern.

Photographer’s note:

India and Pakistan saw an upsurge of Art-Deco style housing in 50s. Some houses were built on large enough plots to house subsequent generations living side by side in contemporary houses.

This plot houses three spacious individual houses with generous gardens.

More on Private Housing and architecture in Lahore was covered in my Blog here: http://iqbalaalam.wordpress.com/category/lahore/

(Source: Flickr / iqbalaalam)

Filed under lahore pakistan south asia art deco architecture modern architecture modernism

57 notes &

M… Manchester
Express Building, Manchester, EnglandPhoto by Ernest Cockburn
Didn’t know there was another Express building, yes, modeled on the one in London, and with many of the same very fine features. 
From Flickr:

Perhaps England’s finest glass and vitreolite Art Deco building, my Uncle occupied a Sub Editors desk there in the 1960’s.

From another Flickr posting, more info:

This is where my father used to work. I just love this building with it’s amazing art deco curves covered with black and mirror glass!
The Daily Express Building, located in Ancoats, Manchester, is a Grade II* listed building built in 1930s art-deco style. It was designed by Sir Owen Williams to house one of three Daily Express offices; the other two located in London and Glasgow. The building was purposely built to resemble that which was located on Fleet Street in London. It features typical Art Deco elements: rounded corners, setbacks and a simple contrasting clear and black glass curtain wall.
The Express began printing there in 1938 having been on the same site since 1927. Construction had to take place in stages so publishing could continue without interruption.
The newspaper left the building in the 1980’s and it has since been converted into apartments and offices.

M… Manchester

Express Building, Manchester, England
Photo by Ernest Cockburn

Didn’t know there was another Express building, yes, modeled on the one in London, and with many of the same very fine features. 

From Flickr:

Perhaps England’s finest glass and vitreolite Art Deco building, my Uncle occupied a Sub Editors desk there in the 1960’s.

From another Flickr posting, more info:

This is where my father used to work. I just love this building with it’s amazing art deco curves covered with black and mirror glass!

The Daily Express Building, located in Ancoats, Manchester, is a Grade II* listed building built in 1930s art-deco style. It was designed by Sir Owen Williams to house one of three Daily Express offices; the other two located in London and Glasgow. The building was purposely built to resemble that which was located on Fleet Street in London. It features typical Art Deco elements: rounded corners, setbacks and a simple contrasting clear and black glass curtain wall.

The Express began printing there in 1938 having been on the same site since 1927. Construction had to take place in stages so publishing could continue without interruption.

The newspaper left the building in the 1980’s and it has since been converted into apartments and offices.

Filed under manchester england uk united kingdom art deco architecture 1930s modern architecture modernism streamline streamline moderne art moderne vitrolite express building sir owen williams

45 notes &

Three Modern airport in France, with nice explanation (below). 

atreide:

Art Deco : 3 french airports.

Officially born in Paris during the “Exposition des Arts Décoratifs” in 1925, the art-deco mouvement has strongly influenced the international architecture between the two world wars. 

Its connection with tourism and travel is strong. This period sees the first air carriers being born, such as Pan Am (1927), Air France (1933) or Imperial Airways (1924) 

Airfields need buildings to host travelers as they are waiting for their plane to be ready or to welcome them when they arrive. The first french Airport in Paris - Le Bourget was built in art-deco style. Bordeaux and Lyon, two other major french towns built their own at the same period, using the same architectural style.

Photographies presented in the current Art-Deco temporay exhibition in Paris.

Filed under modern modern architecture modernism moderne streamline moderne art moderne architecture 1930s 1920s france airport aviation aviation history tourism travel

37 notes &

E… Edinburgh
St. Andrew’s House, Edinburgh, Scotlandby Roger Freedman
St. Andrew’s is the HQ of the Scottish government. 
From Wikipedia:

The building was designed by  Thomas S. Tait  of  Burnet, Tait and Lorne , architects, who won the architectural competition to gain the commission. Construction began in November 1935, and was completed in 1939, the building initially housed the  Scottish Office, including the offices of the  Secretary of State for Scotland. The requirement for the building arose as a result of a post  World War I policy of limited transfer of  devolved  administrative (but not legislative) power to Scotland from London. An official opening ceremony timed to take place on 12 October 1939 was “cancelled due to War” (Britain’s first air raid of the war took place only four days later over the  Forth Bridge). Instead, it was officially opened by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth on 26 February 1940.
Architecturally, the building is monolithic, symmetrical and restrained on the main north facade. To the south, facing the Waverley valley, it is much more irregular and romantic in expression. There are many Art Deco influences.
Tait’s design incorporates elements of Art Deco and Streamline Moderne and is noted for being a rare example of sensitively designed modern architecture in Edinburgh. 
The building features a number of sculpted decorations, also in the Art Deco style, which are credited to several sculptors: Sir William Reid Dick designed symbolic figures; heraldic devices are the work of Alexander Carrick and Phyllis Bone; the large bronze doors were designed by Walter Gilbert and executed by H.H. Martyn; and the secondary doors and stairs are by Thomas Hadden.
St Andrew’s House is designated a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland.

E… Edinburgh

St. Andrew’s House, Edinburgh, Scotland
by Roger Freedman

St. Andrew’s is the HQ of the Scottish government. 

From Wikipedia:

The building was designed by  Thomas S. Tait  of  Burnet, Tait and Lorne , architects, who won the architectural competition to gain the commission. Construction began in November 1935, and was completed in 1939, the building initially housed the  Scottish Office, including the offices of the  Secretary of State for Scotland. The requirement for the building arose as a result of a post  World War I policy of limited transfer of  devolved  administrative (but not legislative) power to Scotland from London. An official opening ceremony timed to take place on 12 October 1939 was “cancelled due to War” (Britain’s first air raid of the war took place only four days later over the  Forth Bridge). Instead, it was officially opened by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth on 26 February 1940.

Architecturally, the building is monolithic, symmetrical and restrained on the main north facade. To the south, facing the Waverley valley, it is much more irregular and romantic in expression. There are many Art Deco influences.

Tait’s design incorporates elements of Art Deco and Streamline Moderne and is noted for being a rare example of sensitively designed modern architecture in Edinburgh. 

The building features a number of sculpted decorations, also in the Art Deco style, which are credited to several sculptors: Sir William Reid Dick designed symbolic figures; heraldic devices are the work of Alexander Carrick and Phyllis Bone; the large bronze doors were designed by Walter Gilbert and executed by H.H. Martyn; and the secondary doors and stairs are by Thomas Hadden.

St Andrew’s House is designated a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland.

Filed under edinburgh scotland st. andrew's house art deco architecture 1930s thomas tait streamline moderne modernism modern architecture scottish