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Posts tagged memorial

15 notes &

Hamburg War Memorial, Hamburg, Germany
Photos by Wendy Darling

For Memorial Day (US), I often post war memorials, so it’s good I happen to have a new one, which I came across in Hamburg. It’s located at the Rathausmarkt (plaza next to city hall) next to a canal and it was only by reading an explanatory plaque that I got some of the background (here, from memory):

WWI / WWII monument in Hamburg, Germany. Originally built in the late 1920s, it was created to be a stark memorial, not something celebrating heroism. It simply says “40 thousand sons of this city sacrificed their lives for you - 1914-1918.” On the other size there’s a 1920s bas relief sculpture of a woman and child. In the 1930s under the Nazis an imperial eagle was added, but after WWII the eagle was removed and the monument became dedicated to those lost in both wars. Annual ceremonies are held here.

My grandfather served three years in the German army in WWI and saw a lot of death, I am told. He left Germany within five years of the end of the war.

Filed under hamburg germany war memorial wwi wwii world war i world war ii memorial monument 1920s german history

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Interior, ANZAC War Memorial, Sydney, Australiaby Chris&Steve
A few of the 120,000 gold stars found on the roof, one for each of New South Wales’ WWI military volunteers.
From an article in the Sydney Morning Herald:

[Greg Read, the memorial’s manager, as of 2004] is also the custodian of the 120,000 stars in the Dome of Stars, one for each of the 120,000 men from NSW who volunteered to serve in World War I, most of whom either died or were wounded. “There are not quite 120,000 stars,” said Read, “because about a dozen of them have fallen out, but I’ve got them in my desk.” Presumably they will be returned to the dome during the $2.5 million restoration the State Government will fund during the next five years.)

And with this I’m done with pics of the memorial and possibly done posting pics of Sydney, for now, unless go find some Harbour Bridge pics, which I may be obliged to.

Interior, ANZAC War Memorial, Sydney, Australia
by Chris&Steve

A few of the 120,000 gold stars found on the roof, one for each of New South Wales’ WWI military volunteers.

From an article in the Sydney Morning Herald:

[Greg Read, the memorial’s manager, as of 2004] is also the custodian of the 120,000 stars in the Dome of Stars, one for each of the 120,000 men from NSW who volunteered to serve in World War I, most of whom either died or were wounded. “There are not quite 120,000 stars,” said Read, “because about a dozen of them have fallen out, but I’ve got them in my desk.” Presumably they will be returned to the dome during the $2.5 million restoration the State Government will fund during the next five years.)

And with this I’m done with pics of the memorial and possibly done posting pics of Sydney, for now, unless go find some Harbour Bridge pics, which I may be obliged to.

Filed under stars anzac war memorial anzac war memorial war memorial sydney australia world war i wwi new south wales

16 notes &

Interior, ANZAC War Memorial, Sydney, Australiaby Chris&Steve
Close-up of one of the “flying” lights I mentioned in passing earlier. 
From Flickr:

The Memorial is historically significant as an expression of public grief and sense of sacrifice following Australian involvement in World War I, aesthetically significant as the finest work of architect C. Bruce Dellit, as one of the finest examples of Inter-war Stripped Classical and Art Deco styles in Australia, and as an examplar of the work of renowned sculptor Rayner Hoff.

Interior, ANZAC War Memorial, Sydney, Australia
by Chris&Steve

Close-up of one of the “flying” lights I mentioned in passing earlier. 

From Flickr:

The Memorial is historically significant as an expression of public grief and sense of sacrifice following Australian involvement in World War I, aesthetically significant as the finest work of architect C. Bruce Dellit, as one of the finest examples of Inter-war Stripped Classical and Art Deco styles in Australia, and as an examplar of the work of renowned sculptor Rayner Hoff.

Filed under interior design anzac war memorial anzac war memorial war memorial lamp light fixture sydney australia wings wwi world war i

28 notes &

"Sacrifice," ANZAC War Memorial, Sydney, Australiaby Chris&Steve
Another look at the sculpture, as seen from the side.
Again, I direct you to some VERY interesting info on this magnificent sculpture — or more importantly additional Hoff sculptures that were nixed — see this article in the Sydney Morning Herald: "Peace offering that shocked the church."

"Sacrifice," ANZAC War Memorial, Sydney, Australia
by Chris&Steve

Another look at the sculpture, as seen from the side.

Again, I direct you to some VERY interesting info on this magnificent sculpture — or more importantly additional Hoff sculptures that were nixed — see this article in the Sydney Morning Herald: "Peace offering that shocked the church."

Filed under rayner hoff sculpture sacrifice anzac war memorial anzac war memorial war memorial sydney australia wwi world war i art deco architecture

15 notes &

"Sacrifice," ANZAC War Memorial, Sydney, Australiaby Chris&Steve
Returning again to the central sculpture, a masterwork of Rayner Hoff. (Yes, nudity, get over it.)
For some VERY interesting info on this magnificent sculpture — or more importantly additional Hoff sculptures that were nixed — see this 2004 article from the Sydney Morning Herald: "Peace offering that shocked the church":

Immoral. Revolting. Offensive. With these words, the Catholic Church killed off one of the most powerful and evocative memorials Sydney has seen. This is a good week - the lead-up to Australia’s true holy day, April 25 - to examine why this loss occurred and why it would probably occur again today.
One of Australia’s most overlooked artistic treasures, the Anzac Memorial in Hyde Park, was best described by the art historian, Professor Virginia Spate, when she wrote in 1999: “Even incomplete, [it] is the most perfect sculptural monument in Australia.” It remains incomplete 70 years after it was opened in 1934 because of pressure from the opposite end of Hyde Park, St Mary’s Cathedral.
In 1930, the most gifted, even sensational, sculptor in Australia, Rayner Hoff, who had emigrated from England in 1923, was commissioned to create a group of sculptures and friezes for the as-yet unbuilt Anzac Memorial. A magnificent Hoff sculpture, Sacrifice, depicting the body of a young soldier held aloft on his shield by his grieving mother, sister and wife, is the central image of the memorial. It has not aged. It is still glorious.
But there are gaps in this building, gaps described at the time by the memorial’s young architect, Bruce Dellit, as being “like a countenance without an eye”. He was referring to the absence of two dramatic bronze sculptures by Hoff that were to have been outside on the eastern and western walls of the memorial. The stone pedestals are there, but nothing is on them.

The memorial is thus “unfinished.”

"Sacrifice," ANZAC War Memorial, Sydney, Australia
by Chris&Steve

Returning again to the central sculpture, a masterwork of Rayner Hoff. (Yes, nudity, get over it.)

For some VERY interesting info on this magnificent sculpture — or more importantly additional Hoff sculptures that were nixed — see this 2004 article from the Sydney Morning Herald: "Peace offering that shocked the church":

Immoral. Revolting. Offensive. With these words, the Catholic Church killed off one of the most powerful and evocative memorials Sydney has seen. This is a good week - the lead-up to Australia’s true holy day, April 25 - to examine why this loss occurred and why it would probably occur again today.

One of Australia’s most overlooked artistic treasures, the Anzac Memorial in Hyde Park, was best described by the art historian, Professor Virginia Spate, when she wrote in 1999: “Even incomplete, [it] is the most perfect sculptural monument in Australia.” It remains incomplete 70 years after it was opened in 1934 because of pressure from the opposite end of Hyde Park, St Mary’s Cathedral.

In 1930, the most gifted, even sensational, sculptor in Australia, Rayner Hoff, who had emigrated from England in 1923, was commissioned to create a group of sculptures and friezes for the as-yet unbuilt Anzac Memorial. A magnificent Hoff sculpture, Sacrifice, depicting the body of a young soldier held aloft on his shield by his grieving mother, sister and wife, is the central image of the memorial. It has not aged. It is still glorious.

But there are gaps in this building, gaps described at the time by the memorial’s young architect, Bruce Dellit, as being “like a countenance without an eye”. He was referring to the absence of two dramatic bronze sculptures by Hoff that were to have been outside on the eastern and western walls of the memorial. The stone pedestals are there, but nothing is on them.

The memorial is thus “unfinished.”

Filed under sacrifice rayner hoff anzac war memorial anzac war memorial war memorial wwi world war i sydney australia hyde park sculpture censorship catholic church bruce delitt

13 notes &

Interior, ANZAC War Memorial, Sydney, Australiaby Chris&Steve
Back to those stunning windows and the 120,000 gold stars. This is a view looking out of the interior towards the park. Note that the light fixtures have wings!
From ANZAC Day which offers some more background:


The Anzac Memorial in Hyde Park South was completed in 1934 as a memorial to the achievement of the Australian Imperial Forces. The building, designed by C. Bruce Dellit, is a concrete structure clad in stone with sculptures by Raynor Hoff.
On 25 April 1916, the first anniversary of the landing of the Australians at ANZAC Cove, a fund was opened to raise money to erect a permanent war memorial in Sydney. By the end of the war the fund had reached 60,000 pounds.
There was disagreement about both the form and location of the proposed memorial. The original suggestion was for a Hall of Memories. Other proposals were for a Cenotaph, a carillon in Centennial Park and later for a Memorial containing a cenotaph, a campanile, memorial arches and a courtyard.
In 1923, the Institute of Architects suggested the memorial be erected in Hyde Park, however no further action was taken until after the Cenotaph was erected in Martin Place in 1926. The ANZAC Memorial was officially opened by His Royal Highness, the Duke of Gloucester on 24 November 1934.
Situated towards the southern end of Hyde Park and centered upon the main avenue, the ANZAC Memorial stands one hundred feet high and, on its main approach, is the ‘Lake of Reflections’, bordered by poplar trees in memory of the battle areas of France.
The central motif of the design is ‘The Sacrifice’. It comprises a bronze group of sculptures depicting the recumbent figure of a young warrior who has made the supreme sacrifice; his naked body lies upon a shield which is supported by three womenfolk - his best loved Mother, Wife and Sister and in the arms of one is a child, the future generations for whom the sacrifice has been made.
It illustrates the sacrifice engendered by war, self-sacrifice for duty and the beautiful quality of womanhood which, in the war years, with quiet courage and noble resignation, bore its burdens, the loss of sons, husbands and lovers.
The group rises pyre-like from symbolic flames of sacrifice, which radiate from its base. Placed centrally in the ‘Hall of Silence’, it is below the eye level of all visitors to the ‘Hall of Memory’, so that all who gaze upon the group from this place of memories must bow their heads in acknowledgement of those whom it symbolises - the heroes and heroines of New South Wales in 1914-1918, 1939-1945 and later conflicts.

Interior, ANZAC War Memorial, Sydney, Australia
by Chris&Steve

Back to those stunning windows and the 120,000 gold stars. This is a view looking out of the interior towards the park. Note that the light fixtures have wings!

From ANZAC Day which offers some more background:

The Anzac Memorial in Hyde Park South was completed in 1934 as a memorial to the achievement of the Australian Imperial Forces. The building, designed by C. Bruce Dellit, is a concrete structure clad in stone with sculptures by Raynor Hoff.

On 25 April 1916, the first anniversary of the landing of the Australians at ANZAC Cove, a fund was opened to raise money to erect a permanent war memorial in Sydney. By the end of the war the fund had reached 60,000 pounds.

There was disagreement about both the form and location of the proposed memorial. The original suggestion was for a Hall of Memories. Other proposals were for a Cenotaph, a carillon in Centennial Park and later for a Memorial containing a cenotaph, a campanile, memorial arches and a courtyard.

In 1923, the Institute of Architects suggested the memorial be erected in Hyde Park, however no further action was taken until after the Cenotaph was erected in Martin Place in 1926. The ANZAC Memorial was officially opened by His Royal Highness, the Duke of Gloucester on 24 November 1934.

Situated towards the southern end of Hyde Park and centered upon the main avenue, the ANZAC Memorial stands one hundred feet high and, on its main approach, is the ‘Lake of Reflections’, bordered by poplar trees in memory of the battle areas of France.

The central motif of the design is ‘The Sacrifice’. It comprises a bronze group of sculptures depicting the recumbent figure of a young warrior who has made the supreme sacrifice; his naked body lies upon a shield which is supported by three womenfolk - his best loved Mother, Wife and Sister and in the arms of one is a child, the future generations for whom the sacrifice has been made.

It illustrates the sacrifice engendered by war, self-sacrifice for duty and the beautiful quality of womanhood which, in the war years, with quiet courage and noble resignation, bore its burdens, the loss of sons, husbands and lovers.

The group rises pyre-like from symbolic flames of sacrifice, which radiate from its base. Placed centrally in the ‘Hall of Silence’, it is below the eye level of all visitors to the ‘Hall of Memory’, so that all who gaze upon the group from this place of memories must bow their heads in acknowledgement of those whom it symbolises - the heroes and heroines of New South Wales in 1914-1918, 1939-1945 and later conflicts.

Filed under anzac war memorial anzac war memorial war memorial sydney australia wwi world war i art deco architecture window interior