Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

Posts tagged marine building

73 notes &

V… Vancouver (Canada)
Exterior Detail, Marine Building, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaPhoto by Steven Ballegeer
There are so many shots of this magnificent building to choose from but I liked this one that shows of the fact the building has so much ornamentation it’s actually like barnacles!
From Flickr:

Vancouver’s Art Deco masterpiece designed by architects McCarter and Nairne. When it was completed in 1930 it was the tallest building in the British Empire. The building’s richly decorated terra cotta exterior is meant to look as if the building had risen from the sea and was still encrusted in marine animals, coral and kelp.
 This is some of the detail at the top of the arch over the main entry.

V… Vancouver (Canada)

Exterior Detail, Marine Building, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Photo by Steven Ballegeer

There are so many shots of this magnificent building to choose from but I liked this one that shows of the fact the building has so much ornamentation it’s actually like barnacles!

From Flickr:

Vancouver’s Art Deco masterpiece designed by architects McCarter and Nairne. When it was completed in 1930 it was the tallest building in the British Empire. The building’s richly decorated terra cotta exterior is meant to look as if the building had risen from the sea and was still encrusted in marine animals, coral and kelp.

 This is some of the detail at the top of the arch over the main entry.

Filed under art deco architecture vancouver british columbia canada facade 1930 terra cotta marine building

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Marine Building, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canadaby Looking&Learning
Posting this pic to go along with a Vancouver Sun article sent in by littleabouteverything:

"Time overtakes the Marine Building"John Mackie, Vancouver SunOriginally published on 7/10/2004
Seventy-five years ago, the cornerstone was laid for the grandest and most opulent skyscraper Vancouver had ever seen. Built at the onset of the Great Depression, the Marine Building would prove to be a financial bust, driving its original owners broke. But artistically, it was a complete success, arguably the best building ever built in Vancouver, and one of the finest examples of art deco architecture in the world."The building suggests some great marine rock rising from the sea, clinging with sea flora and fauna, tinted in sea green, flashed with gold, at night a dim silhouette piercing the sea mists," wrote The Vancouver Sun in an opening day supplement on Oct. 7, 1930.Great marine rock or not, the Marine Building looks impressive from any angle.Looking west from Granville and Hastings, the elegant symmetry of the building’s central tower is simply breathtaking, its white terra cotta trim providing the perfect accent to its brown brick body.Standing in front of the swinging doors at 355 Burrard, it’s hard to know what to highlight: the seahorses, crabs and assorted sea life carved into the bronze door frame, the eight historic ships etched in bas relief above the front arch, or the terra cotta zeppelins, biplanes and trains subtly placed amid the brick to signify state of the art transportation circa 1929.The two-storey-high lobby is just as cool. The soft brown tiled walls give it a timeless air, as if you are entering some special, ancient place (supposedly, it was designed to evoke a Mayan temple). But there are also some classic deco futurist geometric designs, sunbursts, lightning bolts and zigzags.Throw in the mind-blowing elevators (bronze doors a dazzling array of sea fauna and an exploding star, interior an intricate blend of exotic woods) and the unbelievable plasterwork on the ceiling (featuring even more sea life) and you’ve got a building that is utterly unique, and uniquely Vancouver.Perched on the edge of the downtown bluff that was the original Coal Harbour shoreline, the Marine Building was designed to be the office building downtown, an architectural showpiece that would serve as the hub of the city’s thriving marine trade. For a short time, it was the tallest building in the British Empire."It really was designed to be the best building in Canada," said heritage expert John Atkin. "Which it pretty well comes close to being."(Article continues…)

Marine Building, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
by Looking&Learning

Posting this pic to go along with a Vancouver Sun article sent in by littleabouteverything:

"Time overtakes the Marine Building"
John Mackie, Vancouver Sun
Originally published on 7/10/2004

Seventy-five years ago, the cornerstone was laid for the grandest and most opulent skyscraper Vancouver had ever seen. Built at the onset of the Great Depression, the Marine Building would prove to be a financial bust, driving its original owners broke. But artistically, it was a complete success, arguably the best building ever built in Vancouver, and one of the finest examples of art deco architecture in the world.

"The building suggests some great marine rock rising from the sea, clinging with sea flora and fauna, tinted in sea green, flashed with gold, at night a dim silhouette piercing the sea mists," wrote The Vancouver Sun in an opening day supplement on Oct. 7, 1930.

Great marine rock or not, the Marine Building looks impressive from any angle.

Looking west from Granville and Hastings, the elegant symmetry of the building’s central tower is simply breathtaking, its white terra cotta trim providing the perfect accent to its brown brick body.

Standing in front of the swinging doors at 355 Burrard, it’s hard to know what to highlight: the seahorses, crabs and assorted sea life carved into the bronze door frame, the eight historic ships etched in bas relief above the front arch, or the terra cotta zeppelins, biplanes and trains subtly placed amid the brick to signify state of the art transportation circa 1929.

The two-storey-high lobby is just as cool. The soft brown tiled walls give it a timeless air, as if you are entering some special, ancient place (supposedly, it was designed to evoke a Mayan temple). But there are also some classic deco futurist geometric designs, sunbursts, lightning bolts and zigzags.

Throw in the mind-blowing elevators (bronze doors a dazzling array of sea fauna and an exploding star, interior an intricate blend of exotic woods) and the unbelievable plasterwork on the ceiling (featuring even more sea life) and you’ve got a building that is utterly unique, and uniquely Vancouver.

Perched on the edge of the downtown bluff that was the original Coal Harbour shoreline, the Marine Building was designed to be the office building downtown, an architectural showpiece that would serve as the hub of the city’s thriving marine trade. For a short time, it was the tallest building in the British Empire.

"It really was designed to be the best building in Canada," said heritage expert John Atkin. "Which it pretty well comes close to being."

(Article continues…)

Filed under marine building vancouver british columbia canada canadian history canadian architecture great depression art deco architecture 1930 1930s coal harbour skyscraper history design

8 notes &

Facade, Marine Building, Vancouver, Canada by jmv
I discovered a nice photoset on Flickr showcasing Vancouver’s Marine Building. Rather over the top! I’m posting several photos from the set.
From the photographer:

As lauded on its very own website, it really is “Vancouver’s Finest Heritage Building”
On April 22, 2010, I finally had the privilege of attending a Heritage Vancouver event in the penthouse, with Don Luxton and Chuck Davis officiating!  Such a great time! Such a beautiful view! Thanks, @HeritageVan.

Facade, Marine Building, Vancouver, Canada
by jmv

I discovered a nice photoset on Flickr showcasing Vancouver’s Marine Building. Rather over the top! I’m posting several photos from the set.

From the photographer:

As lauded on its very own website, it really is “Vancouver’s Finest Heritage Building”

On April 22, 2010, I finally had the privilege of attending a Heritage Vancouver event in the penthouse, with Don Luxton and Chuck Davis officiating! Such a great time! Such a beautiful view! Thanks, @HeritageVan.

Filed under marine building vancouver art deco heritage vancouver