Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

Posts tagged historic american buildings survey

13 notes &

Interior, Eden Publishing House, Saint Louis, Missourifrom the Library of Congress
Shot of a building window. From a group of HABS photos showing the building interior back when it was abandoned. 
From the LoC:

Eden Publishing House, 1712-1724 Chouteau Avenue, Lafayette Square, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO
Significance: The building served as headquarters for retail and printing operations of the Eden Publishing Company from 1869 to 1979. Several expansions occurred throughout the company’s time of occupation. In the 1930s the building underwent a major addition and renovation into the commercial Art Deco style. The building stands as a representative of German industry that was once pervasive throughout the Lafayette Park neighborhood and across central Missouri.
Building/structure dates: 1895-1896 Initial Construction Building/structure dates: 1902 Subsequent Work Building/structure dates: 1911 Subsequent Work Building/structure dates: 1916 Subsequent Work Building/structure dates: 1930-1931 Subsequent Work Building/structure dates: 1955 Subsequent Work

More on the building over on the Eden Lofts web site.

Interior, Eden Publishing House, Saint Louis, Missouri
from the Library of Congress

Shot of a building window. From a group of HABS photos showing the building interior back when it was abandoned. 

From the LoC:

Eden Publishing House, 1712-1724 Chouteau Avenue, Lafayette Square, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

Significance: The building served as headquarters for retail and printing operations of the Eden Publishing Company from 1869 to 1979. Several expansions occurred throughout the company’s time of occupation. In the 1930s the building underwent a major addition and renovation into the commercial Art Deco style. The building stands as a representative of German industry that was once pervasive throughout the Lafayette Park neighborhood and across central Missouri.

Building/structure dates: 1895-1896 Initial Construction 
Building/structure dates: 1902 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1911 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1916 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1930-1931 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1955 Subsequent Work

More on the building over on the Eden Lofts web site.

Filed under window stained glass saint louis st. louis missouri art deco architecture 1930s historic american buildings survey habs

9 notes &

Interior, Eden Publishing House, Saint Louis, Missouri
from the Library of Congress

From a group of HABS photos showing the building interior back when it was abandoned. You can see the Deco details in this staircase. The building today is now residential lofts. I wonder if the staircase made it.

From the LoC:

Eden Publishing House, 1712-1724 Chouteau Avenue, Lafayette Square, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

Significance: The building served as headquarters for retail and printing operations of the Eden Publishing Company from 1869 to 1979. Several expansions occurred throughout the company’s time of occupation. In the 1930s the building underwent a major addition and renovation into the commercial Art Deco style. The building stands as a representative of German industry that was once pervasive throughout the Lafayette Park neighborhood and across central Missouri.

Building/structure dates: 1895-1896 Initial Construction 
Building/structure dates: 1902 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1911 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1916 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1930-1931 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1955 Subsequent Work

More on the building over on the Eden Lofts web site.

Filed under eden publishing house saint louis st. louis missouri art deco architecture 1930s stairs staircase historic american buildings survey habs

4 notes &

Interior, Eden Publishing House, Saint Louis, Missourifrom the Library of Congress
One of a whole lot of HABS photos showing the building interior back when it was abandoned and going to seed. The building today is now residential lofts.
From the LoC:

Eden Publishing House, 1712-1724 Chouteau Avenue, Lafayette Square, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO
Significance: The building served as headquarters for retail and printing operations of the Eden Publishing Company from 1869 to 1979. Several expansions occurred throughout the company’s time of occupation. In the 1930s the building underwent a major addition and renovation into the commercial Art Deco style. The building stands as a representative of German industry that was once pervasive throughout the Lafayette Park neighborhood and across central Missouri.
Building/structure dates: 1895-1896 Initial Construction Building/structure dates: 1902 Subsequent Work Building/structure dates: 1911 Subsequent Work Building/structure dates: 1916 Subsequent Work Building/structure dates: 1930-1931 Subsequent Work Building/structure dates: 1955 Subsequent Work

More on the building over on the Eden Lofts web site.

Interior, Eden Publishing House, Saint Louis, Missouri
from the Library of Congress

One of a whole lot of HABS photos showing the building interior back when it was abandoned and going to seed. The building today is now residential lofts.

From the LoC:

Eden Publishing House, 1712-1724 Chouteau Avenue, Lafayette Square, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

Significance: The building served as headquarters for retail and printing operations of the Eden Publishing Company from 1869 to 1979. Several expansions occurred throughout the company’s time of occupation. In the 1930s the building underwent a major addition and renovation into the commercial Art Deco style. The building stands as a representative of German industry that was once pervasive throughout the Lafayette Park neighborhood and across central Missouri.

Building/structure dates: 1895-1896 Initial Construction 
Building/structure dates: 1902 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1911 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1916 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1930-1931 Subsequent Work 
Building/structure dates: 1955 Subsequent Work

More on the building over on the Eden Lofts web site.

Filed under eden publishing house saint louis st. louis missouri art deco architecture 1930s interior historic american buildings survey habs

8 notes &

Eden Publishing House, Saint Louis, Missouri
from the Library of Congress

Given the state of the building back when these HABS photos were taken, I was prepared to see a parking lot on the site of this building, but wow, it’s still there (see Google Street View) and these days, Eden Lofts. 

From the LoC:

Eden Publishing House, 1712-1724 Chouteau Avenue, Lafayette Square, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

Significance: The building served as headquarters for retail and printing operations of the Eden Publishing Company from 1869 to 1979. Several expansions occurred throughout the company’s time of occupation. In the 1930s the building underwent a major addition and renovation into the commercial Art Deco style. The building stands as a representative of German industry that was once pervasive throughout the Lafayette Park neighborhood and across central Missouri.

Building/structure dates: 1895-1896 Initial Construction
Building/structure dates: 1902 Subsequent Work
Building/structure dates: 1911 Subsequent Work
Building/structure dates: 1916 Subsequent Work
Building/structure dates: 1930-1931 Subsequent Work
Building/structure dates: 1955 Subsequent Work

More on the building over on the Eden Lofts web site.

Filed under eden publishing house saint louis missouri st. louis art deco architecture 1930s historic preservation historic reuse lofts historic american buildings survey habs

8 notes &

United States Appraisers’ Stores, Baltimore, Maryland
from the Library of Congress

Two views of a mid-1930s building originally built to serve the port. Just looked it up on Google Street View and was frankly surprised it was still standing, even looking good, considering how bad the interior looked in these shots.

From the LoC:

United States Appraisers’ Stores, 103 South Gay Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

The United States Appraisers’ Stores was constructed in 1935 by the U.S. Treasury Department to provide space for storing, appraising, and inspecting imported merchandise brought through the Port of Baltimore. The building is eight stories tall and contains a flat-plate, reinforced concrete structural system and a brick exterior, designed in the Art Deco style. It replaced an earlier similar, but much smaller, building of the same function.

Filed under baltimore maryland 1930s 1935 treasury department port of baltimore art deco architecture historic american buildings survey habs

9 notes &

Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building (Demolished), Cleveland, Ohiofrom Library of Congress
One last pic from this photo survey, which looks sadly like an “urban exploration” foray.
And BTW, yes, the building was demolished just a few years ago, after standing vacant for decades.
From a Flickr post:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Courts Building was located at 1560 East Twenty-First (21st) Street, next to the Cleveland Police Department. The steel and concrete building was designed by Warner and Mitchell in the Art Deco style. The 13-story cut-back tower has a sandstone façade, while the remainder of the building is surfaced with light-colored brick. The Art Deco style was carried throughout the building’s interior and some of the light fixtures are on display at the Western Reserve Historical Society. The tower appears four-sided from the exterior, but within becomes an octagon, with a 3-story rotunda topped with a remarkable octagonal light which could be raised and lowered. Completed in 1931, the building housed courtrooms, offices for county officials and a 350 person jail, which was considered one of the most modern jail in the United States when it was built. With the construction of the new Criminal Courts Building in 1977, the building fell into disrepair. Attempts to repurpose the building for other county and local functions eventually failed and the building was demolished (sometime between 2008 and 2010) and is now the site of a large parking lot.

From LoC:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building is a fine example of the Art Deco Style as interpreted in Cleveland during the late 1920s and 1930s. The interior contained a restrained, but elegant octagonal entrance rotunda. The building housed both the criminal courts and a jail, with an ingenious circulation pattern that maintained maximum security at the same time that it permitted efficient transfer from one to the other. This building was the scene of a number of highly publicized trials, including that of the Marilyn Sheppard murder case in 1954.

Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building (Demolished), Cleveland, Ohio
from Library of Congress

One last pic from this photo survey, which looks sadly like an “urban exploration” foray.

And BTW, yes, the building was demolished just a few years ago, after standing vacant for decades.

From a Flickr post:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Courts Building was located at 1560 East Twenty-First (21st) Street, next to the Cleveland Police Department. The steel and concrete building was designed by Warner and Mitchell in the Art Deco style. The 13-story cut-back tower has a sandstone façade, while the remainder of the building is surfaced with light-colored brick. The Art Deco style was carried throughout the building’s interior and some of the light fixtures are on display at the Western Reserve Historical Society. The tower appears four-sided from the exterior, but within becomes an octagon, with a 3-story rotunda topped with a remarkable octagonal light which could be raised and lowered. Completed in 1931, the building housed courtrooms, offices for county officials and a 350 person jail, which was considered one of the most modern jail in the United States when it was built. With the construction of the new Criminal Courts Building in 1977, the building fell into disrepair. Attempts to repurpose the building for other county and local functions eventually failed and the building was demolished (sometime between 2008 and 2010) and is now the site of a large parking lot.

From LoC:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building is a fine example of the Art Deco Style as interpreted in Cleveland during the late 1920s and 1930s. The interior contained a restrained, but elegant octagonal entrance rotunda. The building housed both the criminal courts and a jail, with an ingenious circulation pattern that maintained maximum security at the same time that it permitted efficient transfer from one to the other. This building was the scene of a number of highly publicized trials, including that of the Marilyn Sheppard murder case in 1954.

Filed under cuyahoga county cuyahoga county criminal court building cleveland ohio 1920s 1930s abandoned building black and white demolished building historic preservation historic american buildings survey habs

38 notes &

Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building (Demolished), Cleveland, Ohio
from Library of Congress

The octagonal rotunda. Photos seem to have been shot while building was in the process of decomposing. This whole scene reminds me of that photo, I think in LIFE magazine, of Gloria Swanson standing in an old NYC theater while it was being torn down.

From LoC:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building is a fine example of the Art Deco Style as interpreted in Cleveland during the late 1920s and 1930s. The interior contained a restrained, but elegant octagonal entrance rotunda. The building housed both the criminal courts and a jail, with an ingenious circulation pattern that maintained maximum security at the same time that it permitted efficient transfer from one to the other. This building was the scene of a number of highly publicized trials, including that of the Marilyn Sheppard murder case in 1954.

Filed under cuyahoga county cleveland ohio art deco architecture 1920s 1930s black and white abandoned building demolished building historic preservation historic american buildings survey habs

3 notes &

Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building (Demolished), Cleveland, Ohiofrom Library of Congress
What looks to have been one of the old courtrooms.
From LoC:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building is a fine example of the Art Deco Style as interpreted in Cleveland during the late 1920s and 1930s. The interior contained a restrained, but elegant octagonal entrance rotunda. The building housed both the criminal courts and a jail, with an ingenious circulation pattern that maintained maximum security at the same time that it permitted efficient transfer from one to the other. This building was the scene of a number of highly publicized trials, including that of the Marilyn Sheppard murder case in 1954.

Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building (Demolished), Cleveland, Ohio
from Library of Congress

What looks to have been one of the old courtrooms.

From LoC:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building is a fine example of the Art Deco Style as interpreted in Cleveland during the late 1920s and 1930s. The interior contained a restrained, but elegant octagonal entrance rotunda. The building housed both the criminal courts and a jail, with an ingenious circulation pattern that maintained maximum security at the same time that it permitted efficient transfer from one to the other. This building was the scene of a number of highly publicized trials, including that of the Marilyn Sheppard murder case in 1954.

Filed under cuyahoga county courtroom cleveland ohio art deco architecture 1920s 1930s abandoned building black and white demolished building historic preservation historic american buildings survey habs

13 notes &

Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building (Demolished), Cleveland, Ohio
from Library of Congress

Close-ups of the facade — eagles, chevrons and other delightful motifs.

From LoC:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building is a fine example of the Art Deco Style as interpreted in Cleveland during the late 1920s and 1930s. The interior contained a restrained, but elegant octagonal entrance rotunda. The building housed both the criminal courts and a jail, with an ingenious circulation pattern that maintained maximum security at the same time that it permitted efficient transfer from one to the other. This building was the scene of a number of highly publicized trials, including that of the Marilyn Sheppard murder case in 1954.

Filed under cuyahoga county cleveland ohio facade art deco architecture 1920s 1930s black and white historic american buildings survey habs

12 notes &

Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building (Demolished), Cleveland, Ohiofrom Library of Congress
Beautiful front entrance. So sad this was destroyed :( 
From LoC:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building is a fine example of the Art Deco Style as interpreted in Cleveland during the late 1920s and 1930s. The interior contained a restrained, but elegant octagonal entrance rotunda. The building housed both the criminal courts and a jail, with an ingenious circulation pattern that maintained maximum security at the same time that it permitted efficient transfer from one to the other. This building was the scene of a number of highly publicized trials, including that of the Marilyn Sheppard murder case in 1954.

Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building (Demolished), Cleveland, Ohio
from Library of Congress

Beautiful front entrance. So sad this was destroyed :( 

From LoC:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building is a fine example of the Art Deco Style as interpreted in Cleveland during the late 1920s and 1930s. The interior contained a restrained, but elegant octagonal entrance rotunda. The building housed both the criminal courts and a jail, with an ingenious circulation pattern that maintained maximum security at the same time that it permitted efficient transfer from one to the other. This building was the scene of a number of highly publicized trials, including that of the Marilyn Sheppard murder case in 1954.

Filed under entrance cuyahoga county cleveland ohio 1920s 1930s art deco architecture black and white abandoned building demolished building historic preservation historic american buildings survey habs