Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

Posts tagged facade

124 notes &

Rand Tower, Minneapolis, Minnesotafrom the Star Tribune
Detail from a 1928 skyscraper in Minneapolis which has just been sold, per this news item.
Details:

An Art Deco gem in downtown Minneapolis has an out-of-town buyer.
Felton Properties Inc. of Portland, Ore., plans to buy the 26-story Rand Tower, a sleek limestone office building in the heart of downtown, for an undisclosed sum. The deal is expected to close in a couple weeks.

Rand Tower, Minneapolis, Minnesota
from the Star Tribune

Detail from a 1928 skyscraper in Minneapolis which has just been sold, per this news item.

Details:

An Art Deco gem in downtown Minneapolis has an out-of-town buyer.

Felton Properties Inc. of Portland, Ore., plans to buy the 26-story Rand Tower, a sleek limestone office building in the heart of downtown, for an undisclosed sum. The deal is expected to close in a couple weeks.

Filed under art deco architecture 1920s architecture minneapolis minnesota 1928 1920s facade

61 notes &

Brighton Park, Chicago, IllinoisPhoto by Debbie
Charming terra cotta detail.
From Flickr:

Brighton Park, Chicago 
Art Deco terra cotta, 4171 S. Archer. Julius Floto, architect. Floto was a civil and structural engineer as well as an architect. He had worked with Frank Lloyd Wright as a structural engineer on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923), Wright’s best-known work in Japan and Tokyo’s premier hotel. Much of Floto’s work was done in the Chicago area. In Chicago, he was architect for the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago (1931), remodeled Goodspeed Hall at the University of Chicago, converting a dormitory into the Art Department (1937), and co-designed the Meyercord Company Building (1938 later the William V. Banks Grand Lodge). He was the architect for the Hawthorne Race Course Clubhouse in Stickney (1924) and planned a one-story commercial building at 311-313 Madison Street in Oak Park (1928).

Brighton Park, Chicago, Illinois
Photo by Debbie

Charming terra cotta detail.

From Flickr:

Brighton Park, Chicago 

Art Deco terra cotta, 4171 S. Archer. Julius Floto, architect. Floto was a civil and structural engineer as well as an architect. He had worked with Frank Lloyd Wright as a structural engineer on the Imperial Hotel (1915-1923), Wright’s best-known work in Japan and Tokyo’s premier hotel. Much of Floto’s work was done in the Chicago area. In Chicago, he was architect for the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago (1931), remodeled Goodspeed Hall at the University of Chicago, converting a dormitory into the Art Department (1937), and co-designed the Meyercord Company Building (1938 later the William V. Banks Grand Lodge). He was the architect for the Hawthorne Race Course Clubhouse in Stickney (1924) and planned a one-story commercial building at 311-313 Madison Street in Oak Park (1928).

Filed under art deco architecture chicago brighton park julius floto illinois facade

33 notes &

Details, Chicago Bee Building, Chicago, Illinois
Photo by Debbie

Close-ups of the richly detailed facade.

From Flickr:

Chicago Bee Building
Bronzeville
Address: 3647-55 S. State St.
Year Built: 1929-1931
Architect: Z. Erol Smith

The Chicago Bee newspaper was founded by noted African-American entrepreneur Anthony Overton. This Art Deco-style building was constructed as the headquarters for the Chicago Bee newspaper. Terra Cotta by the Northwestern Terra Cotta Company of Chicago.

Filed under art deco architecture chicago bee chicago illinois african-american history black history facade 1920s

35 notes &

Chicago Bee Building, Chicago, IllinoisPhoto by Debbie
Very pretty Deco with a green color palette, representing a bit of African-American history in Chicago. (The building now serves as a branch of the Chicago Public Library, BTW.)
From Flickr:

Chicago Bee Building.BronzevilleAddress: 3647-55 S. State St.Year Built: 1929-1931Architect: Z. Erol Smith
The Chicago Bee newspaper was founded by noted African-American entrepreneur Anthony Overton. This Art Deco-style building was constructed as the headquarters for the Chicago Bee newspaper. Terra Cotta by the Northwestern Terra Cotta Company of Chicago.

Chicago Bee Building, Chicago, Illinois
Photo by Debbie

Very pretty Deco with a green color palette, representing a bit of African-American history in Chicago. (The building now serves as a branch of the Chicago Public Library, BTW.)

From Flickr:

Chicago Bee Building.
Bronzeville
Address: 3647-55 S. State St.
Year Built: 1929-1931
Architect: Z. Erol Smith

The Chicago Bee newspaper was founded by noted African-American entrepreneur Anthony Overton. This Art Deco-style building was constructed as the headquarters for the Chicago Bee newspaper. Terra Cotta by the Northwestern Terra Cotta Company of Chicago.

Filed under art deco architecture chicago bee african-american history black history chicago illinois facade 1920s

58 notes &

Haus Atlantis, Böttcherstraße, Bremen, Germany
Historic photos from boettcherstrasse.de

For a glimpse at what was lost in wartime bombing, here are photos of Bernhard Hoetker’s original facade, which dates to 1930/1931. The sculpture you seen was called “Lebensbaum” (“Tree of Life”) and uses imagery from the old sagas, including the central figure of Odin. In the second to last photo you see what it looked like after the bombing (burned) and in the last how it looked in the 1950s through the mid-1960s when the new facade was put in. The “Christmas lights” are actually constellations.

The facade which was rebuilt after the war was originally rasterized right up to the roof with steel supports. The visible framework was accompanied by one of Hoetger’s monumental carved wooden features above the entrance representing the Tree of Life (Lebensbaum). It formed an archaized image of the Wheel of the Year, a cross and the solar disc, symbolically representing the origin of life from the start of the year, in other words the beginnings of humanity. Hanging on the cross was the strange figure of the “Altlantis saviour”, combining the image of the crucified Christ with the pagan Odin.[3] The Lebensbaum, which was violently criticized by the Nazis, was destroyed by fire during the war. In 1954, the feature was temporarily replaced by Max Säume and Günther Hafemann with a facade displaying an abstract representation of celestial bodies but this was subsequently hidden by a closed, concentrically ornamented brick wall completed by Ewald Mataré in 1965.

Update — more background from Wikipedia:

The facade which was rebuilt after the war was originally rasterized right up to the roof with steel supports. The visible framework was accompanied by one of Hoetger’s monumental carved wooden features above the entrance representing the Tree of Life (Lebensbaum). It formed an archaized image of the Wheel of the Year, a cross and the solar disc, symbolically representing the origin of life from the start of the year, in other words the beginnings of humanity. Hanging on the cross was the strange figure of the “Altlantis saviour”, combining the image of the crucified Christ with the pagan Odin.[3] The Lebensbaum, which was violently criticized by the Nazis, was destroyed by fire during the war. In 1954, the feature was temporarily replaced by Max Säume and Günther Hafemann with a facade displaying an abstract representation of celestial bodies but this was subsequently hidden by a closed, concentrically ornamented brick wall completed by Ewald Mataré in 1965.

Filed under böttcherstraße böttcherstrasse haus atlantis atlantis house architecture arkitektur german architecture germany history facade bernhard hoetker bremen germany deutschland

22 notes &

Haus Atlantis, Böttcherstraße, Bremen, Germany
Original photos by Wendy Darling

Now on to the last building I want to share from Böttcherstraße, the building which, rather improbably, contains some spectacular Art Deco. First, however, a look at the current facade and its back history.

In the black and white photo, taken from the small guidebook I purchased, you see the original facade, which was destroyed in World War II. Later, in the 1960s artist Ewald Mataré took it on as his final project. I think the facade (shown) is pretty cool, and I love the font used on the note built into the wall at street level.

Filed under architecture böttcherstrasse böttcherstraße bremen germany arkitektur german architecture facade deutschland ewald mataré bernhard hoetger