Art Deco Architecture

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I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America | Wolfsonian-FIU

New exhibit open at the Wolfsonian in Miami

I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America

June 27 2014 - September 28 2014
Seventh Floor, The Wolfsonian–FIU, 1001 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach, FL

The first major exploration of the theater and industrial designer whom the New York Times dubbed “the Leonardo da Vinci of the 20th century.”

A visionary who was equally comfortable in the realms of fact and fiction, Norman Bel Geddes (1893–1958) played a significant role in the 1920s and ’30s, shaping not only modern America but also the nation’s image of itself as innovator and leader into the future. Bel Geddes most famously expressed his dynamic vision of this American future—streamlined, technocratic, and optimistic—with his unforgettable Futurama exhibition at the 1939–40 New York World’s Fair. Bringing together some 200 never-before-seen drawings, models, photographs and films of theater sets and costumes, housing projects and appliances, airplanes and automobiles, the exhibition underscores that Bel Geddes sought nothing less the transformation of American society through design.

I Have Seen the Future is a traveling exhibition organized by the Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin.

Filed under norman bel geddes design industrial design streamline 1930s 1920s wolfsonian art history

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Art Deco Stamps - Wikipedia

Not architecture, but cool enough to share, I thought.

The Art Deco style also influenced postage stamp design in a number of countries in the twenties and thirties.[3] One of the focuses of Art Deco was transportation and machines, particularly airplanes, and airmail stamps of the period often were designed in this style. Stamps from some countries showed strong art deco influence, while in others it was absent or barely noticeable. The countries whose stamp designs were most influenced by Art Deco include a number of European countries such as France and the Netherlands, as well as several Latin American countries, particularly Mexico, Brazil and Chile. Stamps of the United States and Great Britain, in contrast, followed traditional design and showed little influence of this new style.

More…

Filed under art deco stamps design art history 1920s 1930s

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Orient Express, Paris, France
Photos by Yvette Gauthier

Car from the famed Orient Express. The panels are by Rene Lalique.

From Wikipedia:

The Orient Express was the name of a long-distance passenger train service originally operated by the Compagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits. It ran from 1883 to 2009 and is not to be confused with the Venice Simplon-Orient-Express luxury train service, which continues to run.

Filed under art deco orient express rene lalique design 1920s passenger train train

65 notes &

Now that I’ve posted my pics from Hamburg, it’s time for me to share one of my very favorite things about my whole recent trip: Böttcherstraße in Bremen. 
It’s a street, yes, but it’s special for a host of reasons: 1) it’s closed to traffic, 2) it’s lined with unique 1920s/1930s German Expressionist, Deco and Jugendstil-ish architecture and art, and 3) it’s a unified art/building project essentially the product of a developer and an architect-artist. 
One way I’d described it is something like what would have happened if somebody had given Frank Lloyd Wright a whole city block, lined with buildings, and said “Here’s money. Blow this up, then plan and design something cool. Hire people. Pick the art. But make it cool! (And a testament to our beliefs about the direction of art and architecture and nationalism.)” So everything is almost of a piece, a vision created over about 15 years. 
Anyway, to start things off, before my pictures, history links, etc. I invite you to explore Böttcherstraße via this 360° panorama, which within it offers several other additional treats, entering into the various courtyards. 
Wendy

Now that I’ve posted my pics from Hamburg, it’s time for me to share one of my very favorite things about my whole recent trip: Böttcherstraße in Bremen.

It’s a street, yes, but it’s special for a host of reasons: 1) it’s closed to traffic, 2) it’s lined with unique 1920s/1930s German Expressionist, Deco and Jugendstil-ish architecture and art, and 3) it’s a unified art/building project essentially the product of a developer and an architect-artist.

One way I’d described it is something like what would have happened if somebody had given Frank Lloyd Wright a whole city block, lined with buildings, and said “Here’s money. Blow this up, then plan and design something cool. Hire people. Pick the art. But make it cool! (And a testament to our beliefs about the direction of art and architecture and nationalism.)” So everything is almost of a piece, a vision created over about 15 years. 

Anyway, to start things off, before my pictures, history links, etc. I invite you to explore Böttcherstraße via this 360° panorama, which within it offers several other additional treats, entering into the various courtyards. 

Wendy

Filed under böttcherstraße böttcherstrasse bremen germany german architecture german expresionism expressionism expressionist architecture architecture design art history ludwig roselius bernhard hoetger

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Recently a new book came out on Hildreth Meière, the artist behind such familiar NYC architectural ornaments and murals as this medallion on the front of Radio City Music Hall (photo: NY Times). Since The Art Deco Murals of Hildreth Meière was published, several articles have appeared. Below are handy links:
"If These Walls Could Speak, They’d Say Her Name" (NY Times)
"Art Deco New York" (NY Times slide show)
"The Best Art Deco Designer Who Almost No One Remembers" (The Atlantic)
"New book highlights work of female Art Deco muralist" (AP)
And before you ask, no, I hadn’t heard of her either, although surely there are those of you who follow this blog who have.
Additional links:
Wikipedia: Hildreth Meière
Hildreth Meiere Official Website
Goodreads: The Art Deco Murals of Hildreth Meiere 
Self-portrait, 1943
The book is on my wish list now.
Wendy

Recently a new book came out on Hildreth Meière, the artist behind such familiar NYC architectural ornaments and murals as this medallion on the front of Radio City Music Hall (photo: NY Times). Since The Art Deco Murals of Hildreth Meière was published, several articles have appeared. Below are handy links:

And before you ask, no, I hadn’t heard of her either, although surely there are those of you who follow this blog who have.

Additional links:

The book is on my wish list now.

Wendy

Filed under hildreth meière art deco architecture nyc new york city nyc architecture new york architecture radio city music hall design art history hildreth meiere muralist history of design female artist female designer women's history