Art Deco Architecture

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24 notes &

Majestic Cinema, Darlington, EnglandPhoto by Andy Lamb, The Northern Voice
Movie theater restoration in northern England.
From the article:

 A FORMER Majestic cinema is starting to look exactly that again after months of refurbishment have revealed its stunning art-deco facade.The 1930s building, in Darlington, has been shrouded in cladding and metal girders since becoming an Odeon cinema in the 1940s and a snooker club in the 80s.

Read more…

Majestic Cinema, Darlington, England
Photo by Andy Lamb, The Northern Voice

Movie theater restoration in northern England.

From the article:

 A FORMER Majestic cinema is starting to look exactly that again after months of refurbishment have revealed its stunning art-deco facade.

The 1930s building, in Darlington, has been shrouded in cladding and metal girders since becoming an Odeon cinema in the 1940s and a snooker club in the 80s.

Read more…

Filed under art deco architecture historic preservation darlington england united kington cinema movie theatre movie theater

32 notes &

Photo from a Scouting NY explore of the once-grand Paramount Theatre in Staten Island, NYC. The theater has been shuttered for 25 years now. Some parts of it have deteriorated a great deal, while other elements still retain their elegance. 

Inside the Paramount Theatre, Shuttered For Over 25 Years
Whenever I drive down Bay Street in Staten Island……I always wonder about the boarded-up movie theater between Union and Prospect.
Shuttered for over 25 years, this was once the art deco Paramount Theatre, one of Staten Island’s grandest movie theaters. Built on the site of Cornelius Vanderbilt’s childhood farmhouse, the Paramount opened in October, 1930, with seating for up to 2,300.
Like most of New York’s once great movie palaces, The Paramount eventually succumbed to changing times and closed in 1977. It later reopened as a nightclub, and then an entertainment venue. Among the bands that played the former Paramount were The Ramones, Metallica (opening for Venom), the Dead Kennedys, and the B-52s. The Paramount finally closed for good in the late 1980s, and has been locked up ever since.
For the longest time, I’ve wondered if anything remains of the former theater inside. Then, completely by chance, I happened to get in touch with the owner, and he agreed to a rare tour. Last weekend, I drove out to Staten Island to visit the Paramount.

Photo from a Scouting NY explore of the once-grand Paramount Theatre in Staten Island, NYC. The theater has been shuttered for 25 years now. Some parts of it have deteriorated a great deal, while other elements still retain their elegance. 

Inside the Paramount Theatre, Shuttered For Over 25 Years

Whenever I drive down Bay Street in Staten Island……I always wonder about the boarded-up movie theater between Union and Prospect.

Shuttered for over 25 years, this was once the art deco Paramount Theatre, one of Staten Island’s grandest movie theaters. Built on the site of Cornelius Vanderbilt’s childhood farmhouse, the Paramount opened in October, 1930, with seating for up to 2,300.

Like most of New York’s once great movie palaces, The Paramount eventually succumbed to changing times and closed in 1977. It later reopened as a nightclub, and then an entertainment venue. Among the bands that played the former Paramount were The Ramones, Metallica (opening for Venom), the Dead Kennedys, and the B-52s. The Paramount finally closed for good in the late 1980s, and has been locked up ever since.

For the longest time, I’ve wondered if anything remains of the former theater inside. Then, completely by chance, I happened to get in touch with the owner, and he agreed to a rare tour. Last weekend, I drove out to Staten Island to visit the Paramount.

Filed under staten island historic preservation movie theater movie palace cinema paramount theatre architecture 1930s architecture nyc

21 notes &

Tivoli Theatre, Creston, British Columbia, Canadaby BK-Hunters
From Waymarking:

Quick Description: If anyone built a theatre in the 1930s or 1940s that wasn’t in the art deco style, it would be a rarity.
Long Description: The Tivoli Theatre opened in Creston in 1945 and has managed to beat the odds by staying open to this day. Still screening first run movies, it is presently owned by Mr. G. Anderson. With a seating capacity of 340 moviegoers and a single screen, this vintage theatre is still in wonderful shape, having been restored/refurbished/repainted in the not too distant past, as in about 10 years ago.
Style: Art DecoStructure Type: Culture/EntertainmentArchitect: UnknownDate Built: 1945

Tivoli Theatre, Creston, British Columbia, Canada
by BK-Hunters

From Waymarking:

Quick Description: If anyone built a theatre in the 1930s or 1940s that wasn’t in the art deco style, it would be a rarity.

Long Description: The Tivoli Theatre opened in Creston in 1945 and has managed to beat the odds by staying open to this day. Still screening first run movies, it is presently owned by Mr. G. Anderson. With a seating capacity of 340 moviegoers and a single screen, this vintage theatre is still in wonderful shape, having been restored/refurbished/repainted in the not too distant past, as in about 10 years ago.

Style: Art Deco
Structure Type: Culture/Entertainment
Architect: Unknown
Date Built: 1945

Filed under art deco architecture british columbia movie theater cinema historic preservation 1940s

49 notes &

Washoe Theater, Anaconda, Montana
by BK-Hunters

How bad-ass is it to call your town Anaconda? -Wendy

From Waymarking:

If any vintage theatre deserves to be listed in the National Register of Historic Places it is this one. Opened in 1936 after a depression-caused delay of six years, it remains one of the best preserved vintage Art Deco theatres in the country.

Not only is the theatre well preserved but it has managed to retain its Art Deco originality throughout, from the marquee sign out front to the wonderful murals and ornamentation in silver, copper and gold leaf within. Words can’t do this theatre justice so for more pix see the gallery.

From the NRHP Plaque:

Seattle-based theater architect B. Marcus Pinteca (1890-1971) drew the plans for this remarkable structure in 1930. However, the Depression delayed interior finishing and the $200,000 movie theater did not open until 1936. The Washoe Theater and Radio City Music Hall in New York were the last two American theaters built in the Nuevo Deco style, a lavish form popular for vaudeville theaters.

From the street, the Washoe’s restrained brick exterior gives little indication of the breath-taking splendor that lies beyond the etched glass doors. Designer Nat Smythe of Hollywood created the sumptuous interior, adorning the walls and ceilings with murals. Colors of cerulean blue, salmon, rose beige, and yellow are enhanced by abundant copper plating, silver and gold leaf, and ornamental ironwork. Two magnificent stags are hand-painted on the blue silk plush curtain that graces the stage.

Early advertisements extolled the fine “Mirrophonic Sound” system and the large capacity auditorium that seated 1,000 movie-goers. Admission for first-run films was thirty-five cents. Today, the Washoe is one of the best preserved theaters in the United States, with original fixtures and equipment still in place and in use. It is all the more remarkable for its Depression-era birth, when movie theaters were built on a grand scale but no longer so opulently furnished. 

Filed under art deco architecture washoe theater montana 1930s architecture historic preservsation movie theater cinema

80 notes &

Fox Theatre, Detroit, Michigan
Photos from HistoricDetroit.org

Wow. This rivals Atlanta’s own Fox Theatre for sheer exuberant exoticism. Like many theaters of its era, its style is a pastiche that includes Deco, Baroque, Egyptian, Moorish, whatever looked cool.

From the listing on HistoricDetroit.org:

Designed and built for the Fox Films chain by C. Howard Crane in the Oriental style in 1928, this movie palace contained 5,041 seats and a unique mix of Egyptian, Far Eastern and Indian styles to create a movie palace like no other. It was built to replace the Fox Washington Theatre near Grand Circus Park, which was deemed too outdated and small at 1,862 seats.

The lobby is a half-block long and is six stories high. The Fox has two organs, a 4-manual 36-rank Wurlitzer in the auditorium and a 3-manual 13-rank Moller organ in the lobby.

The Fox opened Sept. 21, 1928, with the silent film “Street Angel.”

Over the years, the Fox held Vaudeville, live stage, newsreels, organ concerts and 35-cent talkies. In the 1950s, the Fox held many premieres and concerts. As Detroit began to decline in the late 1960s and ’70s, it later switched to kung-fu and horror films.

The Fox was beginning to become a run-down theater. It was purchased in 1987 by the Ilitch family, and went through an 18-month, $12-million restoration to return it to its original grandeur. A new multistory marquee was made to replace the badly altered original.

On June 29, 1989, the Fox Theatre was designated a National Historic Landmark.

On Jan. 12, 2006, Atanas Ilitch of Ilitch Holdings announced the recreation of the tower sign on the roof of the Fox. It was completed and dedicated Jan. 30, 2006. The multistory tower features 18-foot letters spelling out “FOX” on four sides, topped off by a dodecahedron star. The sign has a computer controlled LED light system that is capable of many lighting colors to reflect anything from holidays to seasons to special events.

Today, the Fox is a successful result of preservation and restoration that could be done to many of Detroit’s other buildings. The Fox holds concerts and special events, including the Rockettes and “Sesame Street Live.”

Filed under fox theatre architecture detroit michigan historic preservation theater renovation historic theater theater theatre movie palace movie theater cinema