Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

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47 notes &

Got a great comment in today re this postcard image of the Hoe Sai Gai restaurant in Chicago I posted over two years ago here on the blog:

From PJL • 10 hours agoHoe Sai Gai was founded by my grandfather, Joseph Eng. Here’s some reminiscing by my mother, now 88 and living in Honolulu, about the history of the restaurant:Following the 1929 crash after he lost 3 restaurants on West Madison Street, namely: The Golden Pumpkin, Paradise Inn, and the Tea Den, my father, with 5 young children to feed, struggled, mortgaged his house, taking risk, began anew. He rented an empty four story building owned by John Harding in downtown Chicago at 75 West Randolph Street and thus began HOE SAI GAI RESTAURANT.After a few years, father wanted to expand and decided to rent the 3 story —building next door at 85 West Randolph, owned by the Maniere family. He got permission from the City to break open the adjoining walls on several levels. And thus began the subsequent construction of the additional dining rooms, designed with the help of Mr. Fanselow. My father was creative and had his own ideas. The two men worked well together as I, often sat and watched them.The MING ROOM on the second floor with ornate Chinese carvings and a circular bar was very popular. The intimate booths on the main level, was always desirous. The restaurant was very popular with the “after theater crowd” too: streaming in at 11 o’clock p.m. and packed by midnight.The Club Sandwich and Chow Mein could not be made fast enough for the happy and hungry. My favorite……..Broiled baby lobster with shoe string potatoes………..any time. To top it off…….hot apple pie a la mode, served by my cousin Peter.

Thank you to anyone and everyone who comments on the blog, especially to provide historical background, updates on the fate of various structures, share memories, etc.
Wendy

Got a great comment in today re this postcard image of the Hoe Sai Gai restaurant in Chicago I posted over two years ago here on the blog:

From PJL • 10 hours ago

Hoe Sai Gai was founded by my grandfather, Joseph Eng. Here’s some reminiscing by my mother, now 88 and living in Honolulu, about the history of the restaurant:

Following the 1929 crash after he lost 3 restaurants on West Madison Street, namely: The Golden Pumpkin, Paradise Inn, and the Tea Den, my father, with 5 young children to feed, struggled, mortgaged his house, taking risk, began anew. He rented an empty four story building owned by John Harding in downtown Chicago at 75 West Randolph Street and thus began HOE SAI GAI RESTAURANT.

After a few years, father wanted to expand and decided to rent the 3 story —building next door at 85 West Randolph, owned by the Maniere family. He got permission from the City to break open the adjoining walls on several levels. And thus began the subsequent construction of the additional dining rooms, designed with the help of Mr. Fanselow. My father was creative and had his own ideas. The two men worked well together as I, often sat and watched them.

The MING ROOM on the second floor with ornate Chinese carvings and a circular bar was very popular. The intimate booths on the main level, was always desirous. The restaurant was very popular with the “after theater crowd” too: streaming in at 11 o’clock p.m. and packed by midnight.

The Club Sandwich and Chow Mein could not be made fast enough for the happy and hungry. My favorite……..Broiled baby lobster with shoe string potatoes………..any time. To top it off…….hot apple pie a la mode, served by my cousin Peter.

Thank you to anyone and everyone who comments on the blog, especially to provide historical background, updates on the fate of various structures, share memories, etc.

Wendy

Filed under art deco vintage vintage postcard postcard chicago restaurant streamline streamline moderne architecture interior 1930s hoe sai gai joseph eng chicago history

18 notes &

"Century of Progress" World’s Fair Murals
by Terence Faircloth

Panels for the Chicago World’s Fair of 1933-34 which later wound up at the same Chicago high school we’ve been featuring. 

From Flickr:

"Century of Progress" World’s Fair murals created for the General Motors Exhibition Hall. There were 40 murals which showed each state’s contribution to the raw materials used in the manufacture of a General Motors automobile.

When the Century of Progress World’s Fair ended the murals were donated to what is now Lane Tech College Prep High School at 2501 West Addison Street on the Northwest Side of Chicago, Illinois.

P.S. And with that, my friends, I am at least for now done posting pics of Chicago. I will go back into the amazing collection of Terence Faircloth but for now we have seen enough and I’m ready to move on to something different!

Filed under chicago illinois lane tech college prep high school mural murals public art century of progress chicago world's fair world's fair 1930s

8 notes &

Murals, Lane Tech College Prep High School, Chicago, Illinoisby Terence Faircloth
A set of four murals from that same school school. Amazing amount of art. (Pasted into one file because the tall narrow format doesn’t work in Tumblr.)
From Flickr:





One of the frescoes in the “Teaching of the Arts” series by Mitchell Siporin executed in 1938 in the foyer of the school auditorium of what is now the Lane Tech College Prep High School at 2501 West Addison Street on the Northwest Side of Chicago, Illinois.
The work was sponsored by the Federal Art Project which was part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) designed to provide work for unemployed Americans during the Great Depression.

Murals, Lane Tech College Prep High School, Chicago, Illinois
by Terence Faircloth

A set of four murals from that same school school. Amazing amount of art. (Pasted into one file because the tall narrow format doesn’t work in Tumblr.)

From Flickr:

One of the frescoes in the “Teaching of the Arts” series by Mitchell Siporin executed in 1938 in the foyer of the school auditorium of what is now the Lane Tech College Prep High School at 2501 West Addison Street on the Northwest Side of Chicago, Illinois.

The work was sponsored by the Federal Art Project which was part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) designed to provide work for unemployed Americans during the Great Depression.

Filed under mural lane tech college prep high school chicago illinois 1930s mitchell siporin arts

4 notes &

Mural, Lane Tech College Prep High School, Chicago, Illinoisby Terence Faircloth
Huge painting in the school auditorium. Wow.
From Flickr:

Oil on steel painting entitled “Native American Theme” by John Walley executed in 1936; the piece measures 43 ft by 20 ft. and is located in the the school auditorium of what is now the Lane Tech College Prep High School at 2501 West Addison Street on the Northwest Side of Chicago, Illinois.
The work was sponsored by the Federal Art Project which was part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) designed to provide work for unemployed Americans during the Great Depression.

Mural, Lane Tech College Prep High School, Chicago, Illinois
by Terence Faircloth

Huge painting in the school auditorium. Wow.

From Flickr:

Oil on steel painting entitled “Native American Theme” by John Walley executed in 1936; the piece measures 43 ft by 20 ft. and is located in the the school auditorium of what is now the Lane Tech College Prep High School at 2501 West Addison Street on the Northwest Side of Chicago, Illinois.

The work was sponsored by the Federal Art Project which was part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) designed to provide work for unemployed Americans during the Great Depression.

Filed under lane tech college prep high school chicago illinois 1936 1930s painting mural john walley native american american indian

14 notes &

Murals, Lane Tech College Prep High School, Chicago, Illinois
by Terence Faircloth

These are student murals depicting 1) Robin Hood and Queen Catherine and 2) Hiawatha.

From Flickr:

Murals by the students and Thomas Jefferson League executed in 1942 for the school library of what is now the Lane Tech College Prep High School at 2501 West Addison Street on the Northwest Side of Chicago, Illinois.

The murals were sponsored by the Federal Art Project which was part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) designed to provide work for unemployed Americans during the great depression.

Filed under mural lane tech college prep high school chicago illinois 1940s public art robin hood queen catherine hiawatha painting