Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

Posts tagged bank

20 notes &

T… Tainan City
Land Bank of Taiwan, Tainan City, TaiwanPhoto by John Meckley
Deco in southern Taiwan.
From Flickr:

Land Bank Of Taiwan (Old Nippon Kangyo Bank of Taiwan) - Tainan, Taiwan
I don’t usually clip off a corner of a building, but this shot really shows off the very Deco niche.
Location: No.28 Zhongzheng Road (Jhongjheng Rd. 中正路), West Central District, Tainan City
I don’t know the architect, but here’s what I do know thanks to tainancity.wordpress.com/2010/03/05/old-nippon-kangyo-ban…:
Old Nippon Kangyo Bank - The former Nippon Kangyo Bank of Tainan
The old Tainan branch of the Nippon Kangyo Bank is proof that when the Japanese tried to implement modernization in Taiwan, they looked heavily to the Western World. Using Neoclassical architecture for banks was typical in the 19th and early 20th century in the US and throughout Europe. The rows of grand columns used in the Kangyo Bank were no doubt inspired by this. What’s unique about this architecture is that it incorporates the enclosed sidewalks that are typical in Taiwan. Instead of a sidewalk running in front of a colonnade, the pedestrian path is within it. It is also interesting that the entrance into the colonnade is on the corner of the building, to allow passage to the intersection, and not adjacent to the entrance to the bank. While this style is unique, it can also be seen in Taipei in the almost identical Taipei branch of the Nippon Kangyo Bank.
The Tainan branch dates from 1928, built five years after the Taipei branch. It sits across from Old Lin’s Department Store on what was one of the grandest intersections of the city at the time. This was a favored area of the city elites then, and the Japanese were pushing heavily to develop Zhongzheng Road into the city’s first modern boulevard. Much of that modern development has been replaced over the years, but the Kangyo Bank – now the Land Bank – still remains and functions in its original intent. In 1983, the entire west arcade of the building was torn down due to the widening of the road. Authentic restoration was a major project and the result was very successful.
The Nippon Kangyo Bank was founded in Japan in 1897. After the end of World War II, the Taiwan government used the remnants of Taiwan’s Kangyo Bank to form Land Bank of Taiwan. This bank was a government owned institution, and was responsible for handling land policies planned by the government. It became a public company in 2004 and remains a real-estate specialist to this day.Location: No.28 Zhongzheng Road (Jhongjheng Rd. 中正路), West Central District, Tainan City

T… Tainan City

Land Bank of Taiwan, Tainan City, Taiwan
Photo by John Meckley

Deco in southern Taiwan.

From Flickr:

Land Bank Of Taiwan (Old Nippon Kangyo Bank of Taiwan) - Tainan, Taiwan

I don’t usually clip off a corner of a building, but this shot really shows off the very Deco niche.

Location: No.28 Zhongzheng Road (Jhongjheng Rd. 中正路), West Central District, Tainan City

I don’t know the architect, but here’s what I do know thanks to tainancity.wordpress.com/2010/03/05/old-nippon-kangyo-ban…:

Old Nippon Kangyo Bank - The former Nippon Kangyo Bank of Tainan

The old Tainan branch of the Nippon Kangyo Bank is proof that when the Japanese tried to implement modernization in Taiwan, they looked heavily to the Western World. Using Neoclassical architecture for banks was typical in the 19th and early 20th century in the US and throughout Europe. The rows of grand columns used in the Kangyo Bank were no doubt inspired by this. What’s unique about this architecture is that it incorporates the enclosed sidewalks that are typical in Taiwan. Instead of a sidewalk running in front of a colonnade, the pedestrian path is within it. It is also interesting that the entrance into the colonnade is on the corner of the building, to allow passage to the intersection, and not adjacent to the entrance to the bank. While this style is unique, it can also be seen in Taipei in the almost identical Taipei branch of the Nippon Kangyo Bank.

The Tainan branch dates from 1928, built five years after the Taipei branch. It sits across from Old Lin’s Department Store on what was one of the grandest intersections of the city at the time. This was a favored area of the city elites then, and the Japanese were pushing heavily to develop Zhongzheng Road into the city’s first modern boulevard. Much of that modern development has been replaced over the years, but the Kangyo Bank – now the Land Bank – still remains and functions in its original intent. In 1983, the entire west arcade of the building was torn down due to the widening of the road. Authentic restoration was a major project and the result was very successful.

The Nippon Kangyo Bank was founded in Japan in 1897. After the end of World War II, the Taiwan government used the remnants of Taiwan’s Kangyo Bank to form Land Bank of Taiwan. This bank was a government owned institution, and was responsible for handling land policies planned by the government. It became a public company in 2004 and remains a real-estate specialist to this day.
Location: No.28 Zhongzheng Road (Jhongjheng Rd. 中正路), West Central District, Tainan City

Filed under tainan taiwan art deco architecture land bank of taiwan old nipoon kangyo bank of taiwan bank building bank tainan city

35 notes &

A… Albany
Home Savings Bank, Albany, New YorkPhoto by Alain Quevillon
As promised, starting an A-Z of Art Deco places. Certainly only touching down in a few spots per letter, it’s not intended to be comprehensive. But to start, here’s one in the capital of New York State.
From Flickr:

The Home Savings Bank Building is an office building located in downtown Albany, New York at 11 North Pearl Street (NY 32). At 19 stories and 276 feet (84 m) tall, it is the tenth tallest building in the city. When it was completed in 1927, the Home Savings Bank Building was the tallest structure in Albany.
The building features unusual stylized Art Deco images of Native Americans and colonial settlers near its roof and ground floor street entrance.

A… Albany

Home Savings Bank, Albany, New York
Photo by Alain Quevillon

As promised, starting an A-Z of Art Deco places. Certainly only touching down in a few spots per letter, it’s not intended to be comprehensive. But to start, here’s one in the capital of New York State.

From Flickr:

The Home Savings Bank Building is an office building located in downtown Albany, New York at 11 North Pearl Street (NY 32). At 19 stories and 276 feet (84 m) tall, it is the tenth tallest building in the city. When it was completed in 1927, the Home Savings Bank Building was the tallest structure in Albany.

The building features unusual stylized Art Deco images of Native Americans and colonial settlers near its roof and ground floor street entrance.

Filed under albany new york new york state art deco architecture skyscraper bank bank building facade frieze 1920s 1927 Home Savings Bank Building Native American

8 notes &

Central National Bank, Chicago, Illinoisvia Illinois Historic Preservation Agency 
Two story Modern post-war bank. 
From Forgotten Chicago:

Central National Bank, 728 W. Roosevelt, Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, 1947.

I looked up this location in Google Streetview and came back with a building on the UIC campus, which is about the same period but I don’t think the same building. There is a huge parking lot in the area so I think this actual bank building is gone.

Central National Bank, Chicago, Illinois
via Illinois Historic Preservation Agency 

Two story Modern post-war bank. 

From Forgotten Chicago:

Central National Bank, 728 W. Roosevelt, Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, 1947.

I looked up this location in Google Streetview and came back with a building on the UIC campus, which is about the same period but I don’t think the same building. There is a huge parking lot in the area so I think this actual bank building is gone.

Filed under central national bank bank chicago illiois art deco architecture modernism 1940s

19 notes &

West Town State Bank, Chicago, IllinoisVintage Photo via Forgotten Chicago
Beautiful late 1920s building. It quite reminds me of the Federal Reserve Bank in Atlanta, which was built in about 2000 to mimic this classic government architectural style. (See more on this in the excerpt below.)
From Forgotten Chicago’s wonderful feature on the city’s banks, 1893-1933:

When Thomas J. Harper, president of the West Town State Bank, opened for business on the morning of May 24th, 1930, he could not have known it would be the last such opening for some time. That day, after spending seventeen years in a two story building on West Madison Street, the company re-opened in a new nine story “office bank” across Western Avenue (above). The new building was last of its kind in a number of ways, marking the end of an era of Classical decadence in local bank architecture.
Like many other building projects completed early in 1930, the West Town building was planned, financed, and begun before the 1929 stock market crash. The effects of the crash were not felt by most banking institutions until 1931. For example, after opening the new building in May 1930, West Town State Bank failed little over a year later in June 1931. The Great Depression did not create an absolute cessation in all new construction, however, no new outlying bank buildings were built in Chicago until around 1945.
Designed by Mundie & Jensen, West Town was the last tall outlying bank built within city limits until Heritage-Pullman in 1974. Interestingly, Mundie & Jensen was the successor firm of William Le Baron Jenney, the architect of the Home Insurance Building, arguably the first skyscraper, as well as the Horticulture Building at the World’s Columbian Exposition.
The Modern Classical style used in the bank’s design was an intermediate compromise between Classical Revival and Modernism, and was employed frequently in the 1930s and 1940s by conservative institutions. Even though many Modern Classical banks were built throughout the country during the 1930s, West Town was the last bank built in Chicago with any resemblance of Classicism. By the time new bank buildings were being constructed in the mid-1940s, a clean stylistic break had been made.

West Town State Bank, Chicago, Illinois
Vintage Photo via Forgotten Chicago

Beautiful late 1920s building. It quite reminds me of the Federal Reserve Bank in Atlanta, which was built in about 2000 to mimic this classic government architectural style. (See more on this in the excerpt below.)

From Forgotten Chicago’s wonderful feature on the city’s banks, 1893-1933:

When Thomas J. Harper, president of the West Town State Bank, opened for business on the morning of May 24th, 1930, he could not have known it would be the last such opening for some time. That day, after spending seventeen years in a two story building on West Madison Street, the company re-opened in a new nine story “office bank” across Western Avenue (above). The new building was last of its kind in a number of ways, marking the end of an era of Classical decadence in local bank architecture.

Like many other building projects completed early in 1930, the West Town building was planned, financed, and begun before the 1929 stock market crash. The effects of the crash were not felt by most banking institutions until 1931. For example, after opening the new building in May 1930, West Town State Bank failed little over a year later in June 1931. The Great Depression did not create an absolute cessation in all new construction, however, no new outlying bank buildings were built in Chicago until around 1945.

Designed by Mundie & Jensen, West Town was the last tall outlying bank built within city limits until Heritage-Pullman in 1974. Interestingly, Mundie & Jensen was the successor firm of William Le Baron Jenney, the architect of the Home Insurance Building, arguably the first skyscraper, as well as the Horticulture Building at the World’s Columbian Exposition.

The Modern Classical style used in the bank’s design was an intermediate compromise between Classical Revival and Modernism, and was employed frequently in the 1930s and 1940s by conservative institutions. Even though many Modern Classical banks were built throughout the country during the 1930s, West Town was the last bank built in Chicago with any resemblance of Classicism. By the time new bank buildings were being constructed in the mid-1940s, a clean stylistic break had been made.

Filed under west town state bank bank chicago illinois art deco architecture 1920s 1930s chicago history great depression stock market crash modern classical