Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

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8 notes &

United States Appraisers’ Stores, Baltimore, Maryland
from the Library of Congress

Two views of a mid-1930s building originally built to serve the port. Just looked it up on Google Street View and was frankly surprised it was still standing, even looking good, considering how bad the interior looked in these shots.

From the LoC:

United States Appraisers’ Stores, 103 South Gay Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

The United States Appraisers’ Stores was constructed in 1935 by the U.S. Treasury Department to provide space for storing, appraising, and inspecting imported merchandise brought through the Port of Baltimore. The building is eight stories tall and contains a flat-plate, reinforced concrete structural system and a brick exterior, designed in the Art Deco style. It replaced an earlier similar, but much smaller, building of the same function.

Filed under baltimore maryland 1930s 1935 treasury department port of baltimore art deco architecture historic american buildings survey habs

12 notes &

Baltimore, Maryland
from Library of Congress

Deco commercial in Baltimore. Mapped location with Google Maps and this would be right by the Lexington Market Metro stop. No Street View, however, so I don’t know if the building is still there or what it looks like. 

From LoC:

West Lexington Street, Nos. 328-330 (Commercial Buildings), 328-330 West Lexington Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

Filed under baltimore maryland 1930s art deco architecture historic american buildings survey habs

17 notes &

The Sphinx Club, Baltimore, MarylandHistoric photo via girlatlas
From the source, which recounts Baltimore history as it relates both to the club and the death of William L. “Little Willie” Adams:

Called the Sphinx Club — and pronounced the way it’s written, with a  distinctive “p” — it boasted a glittery art-deco front when it was  opened in 1946, at 2107 Pennsylvania Avenue. Charlie Tilghman, an easy-going, likable fellow with a speech impediment  was the operator. His financial backer was none other than William L.  “Little Willie” Adams, black Baltimore’s undisputed numbers king, who  used his cash flow to become a pioneering venture capitalist in the days  when no regular financial institutions lent to blacks.
The Sphinx Club building is vacant and boarded-up these days. Most other  Pennsylvania Avenue structures from that period are already razed,  including such nightclubs as the legendary Royal, the South seas-themed  Bamboo Lounge, the Comedy Club with its huge bar that was in the shape  of the Pimlico Race Course.

The Sphinx Club, Baltimore, Maryland
Historic photo via girlatlas

From the source, which recounts Baltimore history as it relates both to the club and the death of William L. “Little Willie” Adams:

Called the Sphinx Club — and pronounced the way it’s written, with a distinctive “p” — it boasted a glittery art-deco front when it was opened in 1946, at 2107 Pennsylvania Avenue. Charlie Tilghman, an easy-going, likable fellow with a speech impediment was the operator. His financial backer was none other than William L. “Little Willie” Adams, black Baltimore’s undisputed numbers king, who used his cash flow to become a pioneering venture capitalist in the days when no regular financial institutions lent to blacks.

The Sphinx Club building is vacant and boarded-up these days. Most other Pennsylvania Avenue structures from that period are already razed, including such nightclubs as the legendary Royal, the South seas-themed Bamboo Lounge, the Comedy Club with its huge bar that was in the shape of the Pimlico Race Course.

Filed under black history african american history history 1940s the sphinx club sphinx club baltimore baltimore history maryland black and white art deco architecture

18 notes &

Baltimore Trust Building, Baltimore, Marylandby anamalous_a
One last look at this 1920s skyscraper in Baltimore. Today it’s a Bank of America building.
From the photographer:

Baltimore  Trust Building: The roofline is said to be an  example of Mayan Revival  architecture due to similarities with Mayan  pyramids, when viewed  straight on.
For more info on this building, see:
www.btco.net/ghosts/Buildings/baltotrust/baltotrust.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_of_America_Building_(Baltimore)
Historical photos from Historic American Buildings Survey

(BTW, thanks go to mizzelle for asking me if I’d featured this… and when I said I hadn’t, sending me links to a great Flickr set! Posting this and a couple of others.)

Baltimore Trust Building, Baltimore, Maryland
by anamalous_a

One last look at this 1920s skyscraper in Baltimore. Today it’s a Bank of America building.

From the photographer:

Baltimore Trust Building: The roofline is said to be an example of Mayan Revival architecture due to similarities with Mayan pyramids, when viewed straight on.

For more info on this building, see:

www.btco.net/ghosts/Buildings/baltotrust/baltotrust.html

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_of_America_Building_(Baltimore)

Historical photos from Historic American Buildings Survey

(BTW, thanks go to mizzelle for asking me if I’d featured this… and when I said I hadn’t, sending me links to a great Flickr set! Posting this and a couple of others.)

Filed under balitmore trust building bank bank of america baltimore maryland architecture art deco mayan revival 1924 1920s history

2 notes &

mizzelle asked: Have you done any entries on Baltimore art deco? Like the Bank of America/ Trust Building?

I’ve posted a couple of photos from Baltimore but only a couple. I’d be happy to post more if you can give me some names, point me to a Flickr photo set, web site, etc.

Filed under baltimore maryland art deco architecture