Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

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15 notes &

Allstate Insurance Company, Atlanta, GeorgiaPhotos from Georgia State University Photograph CollectionsLane Brothers Photographs Collection
Insurance company building in Midtown, at 1401 Peachtree St. I think it must date to the 1950s. Funnily, at some point in I think the 1990s somebody decided to make it look even older by adding some overtly Deco motifs to it, as you can see in Google Street View here. -Wendy 

Allstate Insurance Company, Atlanta, Georgia
Photos from Georgia State University Photograph Collections
Lane Brothers Photographs Collection

Insurance company building in Midtown, at 1401 Peachtree St. I think it must date to the 1950s. Funnily, at some point in I think the 1990s somebody decided to make it look even older by adding some overtly Deco motifs to it, as you can see in Google Street View here. -Wendy 

Filed under architecture atlanta 1950s modernism modern architecture midtown atlanta peachtree street

39 notes &

The Varsity, Atlanta, GeorgiaPhotos from Georgia State University Photograph CollectionsLane Brothers Photographs Collection
A pic I don’t think I’d come across before — Atlanta’s storied Varsity, on North Avenue by Georgia Tech, back when it was new.
From Wikipedia:

The Varsity is a restaurant chain, iconic in the modern culture of Atlanta, Georgia. The main branch of the chain is the largest drive-in fast food restaurant in the world. 
Originally named “The Yellow Jacket,’ The Varsity was established in 1928 at the corner of Luckie Street and Hemphill Avenue in Midtown Atlanta. Its founder, Frank Gordy, a Reinhardt University graduate, briefly attended The Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) but dropped out in 1925. Then, as now, the restaurant catered heavily to Georgia Tech students. 
As the business grew, Gordy was forced to move the restaurant to 61 North Avenue (on the northwest corner of Spring Street) to accommodate the crowds; the present structure now covers two city blocks. It was here that the name was changed to “The Varsity,” reflecting his desire to expand to other college campuses. During the drive-in era, The Varsity began its curbside service, which continues to this day.
The current location in Atlanta is now adjacent to the Downtown Connector’s interchange with North Avenue. When that freeway (now I-75/85) was built by GDOT, it took out several blocks of Williams Street and much of The Varsity’s western parking lot, forcing a parking garage to be erected as a replacement. The restaurant and the Georgia Tech campus sit on opposite sides of the Connector, linked by the North Avenue bridge.

The Varsity, Atlanta, Georgia
Photos from Georgia State University Photograph Collections
Lane Brothers Photographs Collection

A pic I don’t think I’d come across before — Atlanta’s storied Varsity, on North Avenue by Georgia Tech, back when it was new.

From Wikipedia:

The Varsity is a restaurant chain, iconic in the modern culture of Atlanta, Georgia. The main branch of the chain is the largest drive-in fast food restaurant in the world. 

Originally named “The Yellow Jacket,’ The Varsity was established in 1928 at the corner of Luckie Street and Hemphill Avenue in Midtown Atlanta. Its founder, Frank Gordy, a Reinhardt University graduate, briefly attended The Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) but dropped out in 1925. Then, as now, the restaurant catered heavily to Georgia Tech students. 

As the business grew, Gordy was forced to move the restaurant to 61 North Avenue (on the northwest corner of Spring Street) to accommodate the crowds; the present structure now covers two city blocks. It was here that the name was changed to “The Varsity,” reflecting his desire to expand to other college campuses. During the drive-in era, The Varsity began its curbside service, which continues to this day.

The current location in Atlanta is now adjacent to the Downtown Connector’s interchange with North Avenue. When that freeway (now I-75/85) was built by GDOT, it took out several blocks of Williams Street and much of The Varsity’s western parking lot, forcing a parking garage to be erected as a replacement. The restaurant and the Georgia Tech campus sit on opposite sides of the Connector, linked by the North Avenue bridge.

Filed under the varsity atlanta atlanta history georgia tech north avenue georgia fast food drive-in restaurant art deco 1930s

18 notes &

Atlanta Constitution Building, Atlanta, GeorgiaPhotos from Georgia State University Photograph CollectionsLane Brothers Photographs Collection
One of few examples of Streamline Moderne in Atlanta, this old newspaper building is in a sad, sad state today. It’s been empty and falling apart I believe since the 1970s and despite effort over the past decade to push for it to be saved, it’s still sitting there while people squabble. For an update on the current situation, here are a few recent articles from Creative Loafing, the city’s alt weekly, which now is based in offices only a few blocks away:
Peek inside the historic Atlanta Constitution building before it’s cleaned up
City plans to sell South Downtown’s historic Atlanta Constitution building
Abandoned Atlanta Constitution building featuring public art catches fire
And this CL cover article from 2005:
Constitution Crisis

Atlanta Constitution Building, Atlanta, Georgia
Photos from Georgia State University Photograph Collections
Lane Brothers Photographs Collection

One of few examples of Streamline Moderne in Atlanta, this old newspaper building is in a sad, sad state today. It’s been empty and falling apart I believe since the 1970s and despite effort over the past decade to push for it to be saved, it’s still sitting there while people squabble. For an update on the current situation, here are a few recent articles from Creative Loafing, the city’s alt weekly, which now is based in offices only a few blocks away:

And this CL cover article from 2005:

Constitution Crisis

Filed under architecture streamline moderne modern architecture modernism atlanta constitution building atlanta historic preservation downtown atlanta

6 notes &

Georgia Department of Health, Welfare, and Education Building, Atlanta, Georgia
Photos from Georgia State University Photograph Collections
Lane Brothers Photographs Collection

Another behemoth State of Georgia office building, located right by the State Capitol. Again, this is the “Stripped Deco” style that was very popular from the 1930s onward to the 1950s — a conservative, functional Deco style with Classical motifs, like columns, interpreted in a modern/flat way. 

Filed under architecture art deco stripped deco state of georgia government building atlanta georgia 1950s

33 notes &

Southern Bell Telephone Company Building, Atlanta, GA, Atlanta, GeorgiaPhotos from Georgia State University Photograph CollectionsLane Brothers Photographs Collection
Street-level shot of the building, or at least the portion to the right of the entrance. 
Close-up of those eagles:

Just noticed I posted this same picture a couple of years ago. But that must’ve been 1000 posts ago so whatever :) -Wendy

Southern Bell Telephone Company Building, Atlanta, GA, Atlanta, Georgia
Photos from Georgia State University Photograph Collections
Lane Brothers Photographs Collection

Street-level shot of the building, or at least the portion to the right of the entrance. 

Close-up of those eagles:

Just noticed I posted this same picture a couple of years ago. But that must’ve been 1000 posts ago so whatever :) -Wendy

Filed under architecture art deco atlanta downtown atlanta southern bell southern bell telephone company building 1930s

48 notes &

Southern Bell Telephone Company Building, Atlanta, GA, Atlanta, Georgia
Photos from Georgia State University Photograph Collections
Lane Brothers Photographs Collection

I’ve posted lots of photos of this in the past, mostly ones I’ve taken, but these are some nice historical photos. As you can see especially clearly in the last photo, the building was built six stories high, after construction (which commenced in 1929) was halted by the Depression. Additional stories were added a few years later, in keeping with the original design but without the flamboyant carvings that probably would have been there otherwise. The building was supposed to be even taller than this originally but they settled on what they could manage.

For more pictures of this building, see “Southern Bell” in this blog’s archives

Filed under architecture art deco 1930s atlanta georgia southern bell southern bell telephone company building downtown atlanta construction atlanta history