Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

Posts tagged art deco

98 notes &

Chisolm House, Dalkeith, Australiavia news.com.au
Posh 1930s Deco home in the Perth area.
From a feature article (which includes info on an interior renovation that brought things back to the 1930s/1940s rather than the 80s mismash it had turned into):

Its been the backdrop for Hollywood films, and has a story so rich that it could have a movie of its own, but now Perth’s heritage listed “Chisolm House” is up for sale.Built in 1939 by renowned architect Oswald Chisolm, the stunning Dalkeith home is a perfect example of genuine art deco…
…“It was Oswald Chisolm’s family home up until 1961,” said the current owner.
“When he first moved in he had with him a cook, a butler and a maid, but two weeks later war broke and they were all conscripted, so he was left without any staff.”A famous Perth name, work of Chisholm’s firm in the 1930s included the Forest Park Methodist Church and the remodelling of the AMA House, St Georges Terrace.
The current owner bought the house in 2000, shortly before it was heritage listed.Architecturally the home was stunning, but the interiors had become a mismatch of 80s style and more modern attuning.It took her 14 years, and more than a million dollars, but she wanted to make sure she returned to home to its former glory.

Chisolm House, Dalkeith, Australia
via news.com.au

Posh 1930s Deco home in the Perth area.

From a feature article (which includes info on an interior renovation that brought things back to the 1930s/1940s rather than the 80s mismash it had turned into):

Its been the backdrop for Hollywood films, and has a story so rich that it could have a movie of its own, but now Perth’s heritage listed “Chisolm House” is up for sale.

Built in 1939 by renowned architect Oswald Chisolm, the stunning Dalkeith home is a perfect example of genuine art deco…

…“It was Oswald Chisolm’s family home up until 1961,” said the current owner.

“When he first moved in he had with him a cook, a butler and a maid, but two weeks later war broke and they were all conscripted, so he was left without any staff.”

A famous Perth name, work of Chisholm’s firm in the 1930s included the Forest Park Methodist Church and the remodelling of the AMA House, St Georges Terrace.

The current owner bought the house in 2000, shortly before it was heritage listed.

Architecturally the home was stunning, but the interiors had become a mismatch of 80s style and more modern attuning.

It took her 14 years, and more than a million dollars, but she wanted to make sure she returned to home to its former glory.

Filed under art deco architecture 1930s architecture chisholm house oswalk chisholm perth dalkeith australia

51 notes &

Sunlight Building, Manchester, EnglandPhoto by Hayley Flynn via The Guardian
From “An urbanist’s guide to Manchester,” a write-up of a Deco building in the heart of the city.

What’s the best building?
Nothing beats the simplicity of Art Deco Sunlight House on Quay Street. Designed by Joseph Sunlight and used as his offices, Sunlight was a fairly eccentric man, during his lunch breaks he would take over from the bellboy and operate the lifts. His name often crops up in newspaper archives, the letters section especially, where he chips in with his opinions on new building proposals. He usually offered more idealistic cultural alternatives such as a large gallery and museum instead of the modernist Piccadilly Plaza complex of offices and hotels that was eventually built.When Sunlight died he was the biggest taxpayer in the city and had in his portfolio of work thousands upon thousands of council houses. It’s said that he requested to be buried in a mausoleum on the roof of the building but no such burial happened. Up there instead are a collection of small but perfectly formed Art Deco eagles perched on spikes and posing majestically. At one time higher than anywhere else in the city, Sunlight House heralded a new age, one where smog cloaked chimneys were a thing of the past, and bold new architecture was on the horizon.

Sunlight Building, Manchester, England
Photo by Hayley Flynn via The Guardian

From “An urbanist’s guide to Manchester,” a write-up of a Deco building in the heart of the city.

What’s the best building?

Nothing beats the simplicity of Art Deco Sunlight House on Quay Street. Designed by Joseph Sunlight and used as his offices, Sunlight was a fairly eccentric man, during his lunch breaks he would take over from the bellboy and operate the lifts. His name often crops up in newspaper archives, the letters section especially, where he chips in with his opinions on new building proposals. He usually offered more idealistic cultural alternatives such as a large gallery and museum instead of the modernist Piccadilly Plaza complex of offices and hotels that was eventually built.

When Sunlight died he was the biggest taxpayer in the city and had in his portfolio of work thousands upon thousands of council houses. It’s said that he requested to be buried in a mausoleum on the roof of the building but no such burial happened. Up there instead are a collection of small but perfectly formed Art Deco eagles perched on spikes and posing majestically. At one time higher than anywhere else in the city, Sunlight House heralded a new age, one where smog cloaked chimneys were a thing of the past, and bold new architecture was on the horizon.

Filed under art deco architecture sunlight building manchester england joseph sunlight northern england

65 notes &

Rochester Fire Department Headquarters, Rochester, New York
via Rochester Democrat & Chronicle

Fabulous 1930s fire department building.

From the local paper:

The Rochester Fire Department Headquarters and Shop buildings complex, built in 1936 and located along Andrews Street, is one of the better expressions of Art Deco-style architecture in the city.

Filed under art deco architecture 1930s architecture rochester new york state rochester fire department headquarters fire department

18 notes &

New coffeeshop in Syracuse, NY, built in a retro style, which is good because it’s directly across from one of the most beautiful Deco buildings ever built, the Niagara Mohawk Building.
From Syracuse.com:

The newest Cafe Kubal in Syracuse is going to sport a retro, Art Deco-style look.That makes sense, since the cafe is going to be located in the new Creekwalk Commons at 324 W. Water St. That’s directly across the street from the Art Deco headquarters of National Grid (which most everyone still calls the “NiMo” building)."We hope to be a kind of mirror to the most beautiful building in Syracuse," Kubal owner Matt Godard said.

New coffeeshop in Syracuse, NY, built in a retro style, which is good because it’s directly across from one of the most beautiful Deco buildings ever built, the Niagara Mohawk Building.

From Syracuse.com:

The newest Cafe Kubal in Syracuse is going to sport a retro, Art Deco-style look.

That makes sense, since the cafe is going to be located in the new Creekwalk Commons at 324 W. Water St. That’s directly across the street from the Art Deco headquarters of National Grid (which most everyone still calls the “NiMo” building).

"We hope to be a kind of mirror to the most beautiful building in Syracuse," Kubal owner Matt Godard said.

Filed under syracuse new york state architeture retro art deco coffeeshop coffee shop real estate

38 notes &

Decopolis, Tulsa, Oklahomavia NewsOn6
Deco themed store in Deco-studded Tulsa, OK.
Local TV story:

Tulsa is known for its art deco - the architecture of the 1920s, 30s and 40s has left quite a mark on Tulsa’s downtown – but there’s an island of art deco that’s actually pretty new.Near the corner of 6th and Boston is a fascinating gift shop called Decopolis; and it looks like a step back in time."We have such a variety of stuff we have to theme areas, this one will be kind of fun, colorful bright things,” said local artist William Franklin.Franklin said he loves the art deco period.

Decopolis, Tulsa, Oklahoma
via NewsOn6

Deco themed store in Deco-studded Tulsa, OK.

Local TV story:

Tulsa is known for its art deco - the architecture of the 1920s, 30s and 40s has left quite a mark on Tulsa’s downtown – but there’s an island of art deco that’s actually pretty new.

Near the corner of 6th and Boston is a fascinating gift shop called Decopolis; and it looks like a step back in time.

"We have such a variety of stuff we have to theme areas, this one will be kind of fun, colorful bright things,” said local artist William Franklin.

Franklin said he loves the art deco period.

Filed under art deco architecture decopolis tulsa oklahoma

7 notes &

Wisconsin National Guard Armory, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsinvia Wisconsin Rapids Tribune
Old armory in eastern Wisconsin.
From the local paper:

The Wisconsin National Guard Armory was built in 1940 and is headquarters for the 1st Battalion, 120th Field Artillery and a brigade support battalion headquarters. The building was dedicated by then-Mayor W.T. Nobles “to those who serve.” The ceremony took place as the country was about to enter World War II. Maj. Gary Hildebrandt is the executive officer.

Wisconsin National Guard Armory, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin
via Wisconsin Rapids Tribune

Old armory in eastern Wisconsin.

From the local paper:

The Wisconsin National Guard Armory was built in 1940 and is headquarters for the 1st Battalion, 120th Field Artillery and a brigade support battalion headquarters. The building was dedicated by then-Mayor W.T. Nobles “to those who serve.” The ceremony took place as the country was about to enter World War II. Maj. Gary Hildebrandt is the executive officer.

Filed under art deco architecture 1930s architecture wisconsin wisconsin rapids armory

109 notes &

"Light Rails" - Birmingham, Alabama
by Bill Fitzgibbons

We’ve been seeing a lot of great public art like this in Atlanta, both in terms of murals and in terms of installation art using light. Glad it’s happening elsewhere. -Wendy

From a feature on Tulsa Public Radio:

A San Antonio artist has won a prestigious national award. Light, in fact, is the medium of the piece created by Bill FitzGibbons.

“I installed in downtown Birmingham, Alabama; a public artwork called Light Rails,” FitzGibbons said. “It was put in an art deco 1930s railroad underpass.”

The place was a wide and very dark railroad bridge separating downtown Birmingham from a neat new park and ball field the city built. But as FitzGibbons explained, it was not an inviting place.

“[It was] rather dark and had some transients hanging out in it, and there were some safety issues,” he said.

Birmingham could have just added lights to the area, but instead they had FitzGibbons add art that was full of light.

"And the art deco architecture was just perfect for a light installation," he said. "I wanted to respect the architecture, at the same time turn it into a dynamic, energized artwork.”

Filed under art deco public art birmingham alabama installation art bill fitzgibbons underpass railroad underpass

20 notes &

"Pomp and Circumstance" by Eugene Savageat Honolulu Museum of Art
One of the main attractions from the exhibition “Art Deco Hawai‘i” open through Jan. 11 at the Honolulu Museum of Art.

Exhibition OverviewThe Honolulu Museum of Art presents Art Deco Hawai‘i, the first major museum exhibition to focus on the seductive Hawaiian take on the international Art Deco style, which flourished in the islands from the 1920s to the 1940s.At once contemporary, classicizing, eclectic, and adaptable, Art Deco manifested itself in Honolulu and its environs as a schematized visual language based on the natural beauty and fabled past of the islands. As such, it served as a motivating source for modernism in the fine arts and a sustaining mode for constructing “paradise” for the tourism and advertising industries.Art Deco Hawai‘i brings together a rich and representative array of paintings, sculpture, and works on paper to show how artists active in Hawai‘i during the interwar period—long considered to be isolated, conservative practitioners of watered-down avant-garde formulae—adapted the conventions of abstraction to the Deco aesthetic and developed a regional form of modernism centered on the islands’ singular sense of place.

"Pomp and Circumstance" by Eugene Savage
at Honolulu Museum of Art

One of the main attractions from the exhibition “Art Deco Hawai‘i” open through Jan. 11 at the Honolulu Museum of Art.

Exhibition Overview

The Honolulu Museum of Art presents Art Deco Hawai‘i, the first major museum exhibition to focus on the seductive Hawaiian take on the international Art Deco style, which flourished in the islands from the 1920s to the 1940s.

At once contemporary, classicizing, eclectic, and adaptable, Art Deco manifested itself in Honolulu and its environs as a schematized visual language based on the natural beauty and fabled past of the islands. As such, it served as a motivating source for modernism in the fine arts and a sustaining mode for constructing “paradise” for the tourism and advertising industries.

Art Deco Hawai‘i brings together a rich and representative array of paintings, sculpture, and works on paper to show how artists active in Hawai‘i during the interwar period—long considered to be isolated, conservative practitioners of watered-down avant-garde formulae—adapted the conventions of abstraction to the Deco aesthetic and developed a regional form of modernism centered on the islands’ singular sense of place.

Filed under art deco art history hawaii honolulu honolulu museum of art eugene savage