Art Deco Architecture

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Posts tagged Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes

2 notes &

From Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression by Morris Dickstein:

If the furnishings and interiors of the Paris expo affected American designers, the pavilions themselves, though soon to be torn down, had just as great an influence on American’s commercial architects. Ely Jacques Kahn, a pioneer Deco architect, was deeply impressed by what he encountered in Paris and soon began applying it to commissions in New York, including in 1927 his best-known building, at 2 Park Avenue, marked by richly colored terra-cotta panels on its exterior and by a lavishly decorated lobby that included a mosaic ceiling, marble walls, bronze and glass revolving doors, ornate lighting, and bronze elevator doors decorated with bas relief designs.

Illustration: Book cover featuring 2 Park Avenue.
For a short bio of Kahn, see Wikipedia.
Also, trivia point: “In what has become an iconic photograph, Kahn masqueraded as his own Squibb Building with other architects dressed as buildings for the Beaux Arts Ball of 1931.”

From Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression by Morris Dickstein:

If the furnishings and interiors of the Paris expo affected American designers, the pavilions themselves, though soon to be torn down, had just as great an influence on American’s commercial architects. Ely Jacques Kahn, a pioneer Deco architect, was deeply impressed by what he encountered in Paris and soon began applying it to commissions in New York, including in 1927 his best-known building, at 2 Park Avenue, marked by richly colored terra-cotta panels on its exterior and by a lavishly decorated lobby that included a mosaic ceiling, marble walls, bronze and glass revolving doors, ornate lighting, and bronze elevator doors decorated with bas relief designs.

Illustration: Book cover featuring 2 Park Avenue.

For a short bio of Kahn, see Wikipedia.

Also, trivia point: “In what has become an iconic photograph, Kahn masqueraded as his own Squibb Building with other architects dressed as buildings for the Beaux Arts Ball of 1931.”

Filed under morris dickstein dancing in the dark Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes art deco 1920s 1930s art history architecture ely jacques kahn 2 park avenue nyc new york city manhattan

32 notes &

From Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression by Morris Dickstein:

This [the styles of the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes] is a long way from American vernacular design in the 1930s, yet the Deco impulse found its most ubiquitous flowering in the United States, albeit in the simplified, democratized form of a mischievously playful new modern style. Cultivated Americans in the 1920s looked up to the French. A downsized version of the great expo evoked widespread interest when it traveled to eight American cities in 1926. It had an almost instantaneous effect on everything from jewelry, clothes, and furnishing to graphic design, especially posters and book jackets.

Illustration is original poster for the expo.

From Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression by Morris Dickstein:

This [the styles of the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes] is a long way from American vernacular design in the 1930s, yet the Deco impulse found its most ubiquitous flowering in the United States, albeit in the simplified, democratized form of a mischievously playful new modern style. Cultivated Americans in the 1920s looked up to the French. A downsized version of the great expo evoked widespread interest when it traveled to eight American cities in 1926. It had an almost instantaneous effect on everything from jewelry, clothes, and furnishing to graphic design, especially posters and book jackets.

Illustration is original poster for the expo.

Filed under exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes art deco 1920s 1930s 1925 design architecture industrial design art history French design 1926 graphic design

24 notes &

From Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression by Morris Dickstein:

Much of what happened in Deco through the end of the thirties was leagues away from its formal beginning in 1925. The launch of the Deco style, the Deco craze, is usually traced to the great Paris expos of 1925, officially called the Exposition Internationale des arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes. The United States declined to participate since its secretary of commerce, Herbert Hoover, insisted it had no modern design to contribute. Scholars had shown that far from inaugurating the Deco wave, the 1925 expo consolidated decorative trends that went back to 1908 or 1910, especially in France.

French Deco was symbolized by the work of Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann, who also put together the expo’s most famous exhibit, the luxurious L’Hôtel du Collectionneur, a stunningly sumptuous model interior that later Deco shows have tried to recreate. Alastair Duncan has written, “Only the rarest an most exquisite materials were used by Ruhlmann for his furniture. Rich veneers such a palisander, amboyna, amaranth, macassar ebony and Cuban mahogany, were inlaid with ivory, tortoise shell or horn. Dressing tables were embellished with leather, galuchat [sharkskin] or parchment panelling. Silk tassels applied to drawer pulls added a further touch of elegance.

Illustrations are all original images from the expo.

Filed under exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes art deco modernism design architecture art history history 1925 1920s

39 notes &

Room in the Spring PavilionFrom Ensembles mobiliers (1925) via NYPL
Another from the Exposition’s Pavillon Primavera from Ensembles mobiliers. Same architect as previous room and it might be the same room, just another angle.
Caption: “Hall du Pavillon Primavera , A. Levard, architecte”
About the Book

Published in conjunction with the Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes — the 1925 Paris exposition considered the blast-off point for Art Deco and later the origin of term — Ensembles mobiliers (translation: Furniture sets) is filled with the very latest, most stylish ideas in contemporary interior design. Here are laid out templates for a style that would take the world by storm, from dining rooms to Hollywood musical sets to public spaces.

Room in the Spring Pavilion
From Ensembles mobiliers (1925) via NYPL

Another from the Exposition’s Pavillon Primavera from Ensembles mobiliers. Same architect as previous room and it might be the same room, just another angle.

Caption: “Hall du Pavillon Primavera , A. Levard, architecte

About the Book

Published in conjunction with the Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes — the 1925 Paris exposition considered the blast-off point for Art Deco and later the origin of term — Ensembles mobiliers (translation: Furniture sets) is filled with the very latest, most stylish ideas in contemporary interior design. Here are laid out templates for a style that would take the world by storm, from dining rooms to Hollywood musical sets to public spaces.

Filed under art deco furniture design interior design 1920s 1925 art history decor ensembles mobiliers Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes

10 notes &

Room in the Spring PavilionFrom Ensembles mobiliers (1925) via NYPL
A room from the Exposition’s Pavillon Primavera from Ensembles mobiliers.
Caption: “Hall du Pavillon Primavera , A. Levard, architecte”
About the Book

Published in conjunction with the Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes — the 1925 Paris exposition considered the blast-off point for Art Deco and later the origin of term — Ensembles mobiliers (translation: Furniture sets) is filled with the very latest, most stylish ideas in contemporary interior design. Here are laid out templates for a style that would take the world by storm, from dining rooms to Hollywood musical sets to public spaces.

Room in the Spring Pavilion
From Ensembles mobiliers (1925) via NYPL

A room from the Exposition’s Pavillon Primavera from Ensembles mobiliers.

Caption: “Hall du Pavillon Primavera , A. Levard, architecte

About the Book

Published in conjunction with the Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes — the 1925 Paris exposition considered the blast-off point for Art Deco and later the origin of term — Ensembles mobiliers (translation: Furniture sets) is filled with the very latest, most stylish ideas in contemporary interior design. Here are laid out templates for a style that would take the world by storm, from dining rooms to Hollywood musical sets to public spaces.

Filed under art deco furniture design interior design 1920s 1925 art history decor ensembles mobiliers Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes

3 notes &

Title Page, Ensembles mobiliers (1925)Via NYPL
Title page in a book I’m about to post quite a few pictures from, Ensembles mobiliers (translation: Furniture Sets).
Published in conjunction with the Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes — the 1925 Paris exposition considered the blast-off point for Art Deco and later the origin of term — this book is filled with the very latest, most stylish ideas in contemporary interior design. NYPL has the entire book scanned in and available in its Digital Gallery, and so I’ve gone through it and will be sharing the best, which will take some time because there are so many gorgeous things. So sit back and enjoy…
About thé Exposition
Some choice excerpts from Wikipedia:

The International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts (French: Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes) was a World’s fair held in Paris, France, from April to October 1925. The term “Art Deco” was derived by shortening the words Arts Décoratifs, in the title of this exposition, but not until the late 1960s by British art critic and historian, Bevis Hillier…
This exhibition epitomized what came to be called decades later “Art Deco,” a “modern” style characterized by a streamlined classicism, geometric and symmetric compositions, and a sleek machine-age look. The Exposition poster, by Robert Bonfils, imitating the look of a woodblock print, featured a modern athletic nymph and a racing gazelle. René Lalique’s crystal tower fountain was a prominent set-piece of the Exposition. Other prominent motifs included stylized animals, lightning flashes, and “Aztec” (and other exotic) motifs. Some of these were motifs and the design aesthetic was derived from French Decorative Cubism, German Bauhaus, Italian Futurism, and Russian Constructivism.
The central body of exhibits seemed to present the fashionable products of the luxury market, a signal that, after the disasters of World War I, Paris still reigned supreme in the arts of design.

I will be pulling from other sources coming up but thought that was a good start.

Title Page, Ensembles mobiliers (1925)
Via NYPL

Title page in a book I’m about to post quite a few pictures from, Ensembles mobiliers (translation: Furniture Sets).

Published in conjunction with the Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes — the 1925 Paris exposition considered the blast-off point for Art Deco and later the origin of term — this book is filled with the very latest, most stylish ideas in contemporary interior design. NYPL has the entire book scanned in and available in its Digital Gallery, and so I’ve gone through it and will be sharing the best, which will take some time because there are so many gorgeous things. So sit back and enjoy…

About thé Exposition

Some choice excerpts from Wikipedia:

The International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts (French: Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes) was a World’s fair held in Paris, France, from April to October 1925. The term “Art Deco” was derived by shortening the words Arts Décoratifs, in the title of this exposition, but not until the late 1960s by British art critic and historian, Bevis Hillier…

This exhibition epitomized what came to be called decades later “Art Deco,” a “modern” style characterized by a streamlined classicism, geometric and symmetric compositions, and a sleek machine-age look. The Exposition poster, by Robert Bonfils, imitating the look of a woodblock print, featured a modern athletic nymph and a racing gazelle. René Lalique’s crystal tower fountain was a prominent set-piece of the Exposition. Other prominent motifs included stylized animals, lightning flashes, and “Aztec” (and other exotic) motifs. Some of these were motifs and the design aesthetic was derived from French Decorative Cubism, German Bauhaus, Italian Futurism, and Russian Constructivism.

The central body of exhibits seemed to present the fashionable products of the luxury market, a signal that, after the disasters of World War I, Paris still reigned supreme in the arts of design.

I will be pulling from other sources coming up but thought that was a good start.

Filed under ensembles mobiliers furniture interior design 1920s 1925 art deco Exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts design

0 notes &

Virtual Visit to the Exposition Des Arts Décoratifs

The term Art Deco was derived from name of a 1925 World’s Fair, The Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts) held in Paris, France. This web site provides detailed info on this event, taken from a 1988 article in World’s Fair magazine.

Filed under art deco exposition internationale des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes worlds fair design 1920s architecture interior design french design french art deco