Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

Posts tagged 1940s

15 notes &

"Art Deco Hawaii" at The Honolulu Museum of Art

Report from Hawaii News Now (click link for video) on new exhibit on Art Deco Hawaii.

Filed under art deco art history 1920s art 1930s art 1940s art hawaii honolulu 1920s 1930s 1940s

21 notes &

Tivoli Theatre, Creston, British Columbia, Canadaby BK-Hunters
From Waymarking:

Quick Description: If anyone built a theatre in the 1930s or 1940s that wasn’t in the art deco style, it would be a rarity.
Long Description: The Tivoli Theatre opened in Creston in 1945 and has managed to beat the odds by staying open to this day. Still screening first run movies, it is presently owned by Mr. G. Anderson. With a seating capacity of 340 moviegoers and a single screen, this vintage theatre is still in wonderful shape, having been restored/refurbished/repainted in the not too distant past, as in about 10 years ago.
Style: Art DecoStructure Type: Culture/EntertainmentArchitect: UnknownDate Built: 1945

Tivoli Theatre, Creston, British Columbia, Canada
by BK-Hunters

From Waymarking:

Quick Description: If anyone built a theatre in the 1930s or 1940s that wasn’t in the art deco style, it would be a rarity.

Long Description: The Tivoli Theatre opened in Creston in 1945 and has managed to beat the odds by staying open to this day. Still screening first run movies, it is presently owned by Mr. G. Anderson. With a seating capacity of 340 moviegoers and a single screen, this vintage theatre is still in wonderful shape, having been restored/refurbished/repainted in the not too distant past, as in about 10 years ago.

Style: Art Deco
Structure Type: Culture/Entertainment
Architect: Unknown
Date Built: 1945

Filed under art deco architecture british columbia movie theater cinema historic preservation 1940s

20 notes &

Florence Hotel, Missoula, Montanaby BK-Hunters
Really like this one. And check out the entrance. (Interior pics coming.)

From Waymarking:

The original Florence Hotel, built on this site in 1888, offered weary railway travelers and settlers a comfortable night’s lodging. When it burned in 1913, the Florence was rebuilt as a major 106-room hostelry and was a longtime regional gathering place until it, too, was destroyed by fire in 1936. 
Missoula’s lack of a major hotel had serious implications, and even though the nation was then in the midst of the Depression, Walter H. McLeod and other influential businessmen secured community support to rebuild. When the elegant new Florence Hotel opened in 1941, Missoulians were especially proud that 67 percent ownership belonged to community shareholders. Spokane architect G. A. Pehrson masterfully designed the $600,000 “jewel of a hotel” in the new Art Moderne style, characterized by its rounded corners and horizontal emphasis. Terra cotta and glass blocks accent the shiny-smooth concrete and metal surfaces. The splendid 140-room hotel boasted the Northwest’s first central air conditioning system, novel glass shower doors, and first-class interior appointments in a “harmony of color.” One of only two local examples of the style, the third generation Florence reflects the town’s steadfast regional importance into the twentieth century, the growth of tourism, and the civic pride that prompted its construction. From the NRHP Plaque

Florence Hotel, Missoula, Montana
by BK-Hunters

Really like this one. And check out the entrance. (Interior pics coming.)

From Waymarking:

The original Florence Hotel, built on this site in 1888, offered weary railway travelers and settlers a comfortable night’s lodging. When it burned in 1913, the Florence was rebuilt as a major 106-room hostelry and was a longtime regional gathering place until it, too, was destroyed by fire in 1936.

Missoula’s lack of a major hotel had serious implications, and even though the nation was then in the midst of the Depression, Walter H. McLeod and other influential businessmen secured community support to rebuild. When the elegant new Florence Hotel opened in 1941, Missoulians were especially proud that 67 percent ownership belonged to community shareholders. Spokane architect G. A. Pehrson masterfully designed the $600,000 “jewel of a hotel” in the new Art Moderne style, characterized by its rounded corners and horizontal emphasis. Terra cotta and glass blocks accent the shiny-smooth concrete and metal surfaces. The splendid 140-room hotel boasted the Northwest’s first central air conditioning system, novel glass shower doors, and first-class interior appointments in a “harmony of color.” One of only two local examples of the style, the third generation Florence reflects the town’s steadfast regional importance into the twentieth century, the growth of tourism, and the civic pride that prompted its construction. 
From the NRHP Plaque

Filed under art moderne streamline moderne architcture 1940s missoula montana florence hotel hotel

40 notes &

1930s-40s in Color

Click the link for a great, great set of images available online thanks to the Library of Congress.

Sharing this not because it’s Deco architecture but because it’s images of America from the 30s and 40s in color, which for many is a real eye-opener, making those times much more real and the people more relatable. It’s also a way to be aware that while all these swanky movies theaters were up and running and great skyscrapers being built, millions of Americans were living on subsistence, as migrant workers, sharecroppers, and living in shacks with no water, electricity or heat. (Which is why the 1939/40 World’s Fair’s image of a shiny future America without want was so popular!)

Anyway, enjoy the images!

-Wendy

Filed under 1940s 1930s american history library of congress farm security administration office of war information great depression

59 notes &

Vanity Ballroom, Detroit, Michigan
Historic Photos & Modern Photos from HistoricDetroit.org

As it was then and is it is now. The building, built the year of the Stock Market Crash, has been unoccupied and deteriorating since the late 1980s. It managed to survive the crash of big bands and ballroom dancing and served as the venue of punk concerts, but now it languishes and would seem to be caving in on itself. Very sad.

From the listing on HistoricDetroit.org:

Couples used to swing to big band sounds and rockers like the MC5 and the Stooges used to rock in a Mayan temple on the city’s east side.

The Vanity Ballroom opened on the eve of the stock market crash in 1929 on Detroit’s far east side at Newport and Jefferson. It followed several other venues that opened in the 1920s, but because of the Depression, it was the last ballroom to open in the city. Despite the Depression, the Vanity was one of the most popular dance venues in town and a place generations of Detroiters went to hear live performances by Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Louis Prima, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey and Cab Calloway.

Such spectacular venues were popular places for Detroiters to go dance the night away and socialize. In its heyday, the Vanity hosted huge crowds – up to a 1,000 couples. Five nights a week, they danced to the big bands on the 5,600-square-foot maple dance floor, where couples “floated” on springs that gave the floor bounce. Patrons - who paid 35 cents to get in - would enter from the first floor and ascend a grand main staircase before entering a ballroom that took them to a different time and place – an ancient Aztec temple.

In designing the Vanity, local architect Charles N. Agree worked an Aztec theme into the Art Deco style. The ballroom is filled with stepped archways, rich earth-toned colors and Aztec symbols, all inspired by pre-Columbian archaeological discoveries of the time. Stylized Indian heads, stepped-brick archways and green-glazed tiles hovered over the dancers’ heads. The outside of the building is faced with orange brick with stone and tile ornamentation…

…As testament to the Vanity’s architectural and cultural importance, the ballroom was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on Nov. 12, 1982. It is not considered such by the state of Michigan…

…In May 2008, the Vanity was included on a Preservation Detroit list of 10 endangered Detroit buildings. Since, however, the roof has continued to fail, and vandals and looters have hit the building hard. This temple to entertainment, meant to evoke the temples of ancient civilizations, is quickly following them into ruin.

Filed under art deco architecture historic preservation detroit michigan vanity ballroom ballroom detroit history 1930s 1940s aztec deco national register of historic places places in peril endangered building

26 notes &

N.. Newcastle-upon-Tyne

Wills Building, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England
Photos by Simon Godley

Nice set of shot of a Newcastle landmark.

From Flickr:

The Wills Building is a well-known landmark in Newcastle upon Tyne. It was built in the Art Deco style as a cigarette factory in the late 1940s for W. D. & H. O. Wills. It is situated on the New Coast Road from Newcastle upon Tyne to the Billy Mill roundabout in North Shields, and overlooks the Wallsend golf course. It was originally built with the office block facing onto the New Coast Road with the factory itself forming the wings and rear of the building, making the whole factory complex into a quadrangle. After the factory closed in 1986 it stood empty for a number of years. The main building was eventually converted into luxury residential apartments by George Wimpey and was officially reopened as The Wills Building in November 1998.

Filed under newcastle newcastle-upon-tyne england wills building art deco architecture 1940s