Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

Posts tagged 1939

21 notes &

Works Progress Administration Building, Queens, New York
Naturally the New York World’s Fair 1939/1940 had to have a WPA building!
nyworldsfaircollections:

Collection Highlight
William A. Dobak. Works Progress Administration Building, 1939. Collection on the 1939/1940 New York World’s Fair. Museum of the City of New York, X2012.66.170

Works Progress Administration Building, Queens, New York

Naturally the New York World’s Fair 1939/1940 had to have a WPA building!

nyworldsfaircollections:

Collection Highlight

William A. Dobak. Works Progress Administration Building, 1939. Collection on the 1939/1940 New York World’s Fair. Museum of the City of New York, X2012.66.170

Filed under wpa works progress administration queens nyc new york city new york world's fair 1939 1940s 1930s art deco architecture

28 notes &

E… Evansville
Greyhound Bus Terminal, Evansville, Indianaby Kerry
There are so many great pics of this Streamline station, it was hard to choose one, but I chose this close up. 
Here’s background from one of my favorite web sites, Roadside Architecture:

The Evansville station was designed by Arrasmith and built from 1938-1939. The initial plans called for an exterior faced with Indiana limestone. Postcards, like that above, show the building with the incorrect color scheme. The central cylinder design suited this corner location and was repeated in later Greyhound stations. This building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 2007, Greyhound moved to a new facility and this building has been vacant since then. The windows were boarded in 2009 and the porcelain enamel panels have been painted a lighter blue. In 2011, it was announced that the building would soon house the Indiana Landmarks southwest field office. For more, see these websites: 1,2, 3.

E… Evansville

Greyhound Bus Terminal, Evansville, Indiana
by Kerry

There are so many great pics of this Streamline station, it was hard to choose one, but I chose this close up. 

Here’s background from one of my favorite web sites, Roadside Architecture:

The Evansville station was designed by Arrasmith and built from 1938-1939. The initial plans called for an exterior faced with Indiana limestone. Postcards, like that above, show the building with the incorrect color scheme. The central cylinder design suited this corner location and was repeated in later Greyhound stations. This building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 2007, Greyhound moved to a new facility and this building has been vacant since then. The windows were boarded in 2009 and the porcelain enamel panels have been painted a lighter blue. In 2011, it was announced that the building would soon house the Indiana Landmarks southwest field office. For more, see these websites: 1,23.

Filed under evansville indiana art deco architecture streamline streamline moderne art moderne greyhound greyhound bus station bus station bus travel arrasmith 1938 1939 1930s

16 notes &

Martin Luther King Jr. Federal Building, Atlanta, GAby Brent Moore
As I’ve mentioned here a couple of times, I’ll be talking about this blog at SoCon here in Atlanta, and with the event this weekend, I thought I’d switch off lamps and for a bit and switch onto some of Atlanta’s landmark Art Deco. That way, people can see what this blog is mostly about — buildings. (Although I still like lamps and furniture and staircases, he he.)
To start with, a grand 1930s building that’s just down the street from me. This building was originally built as a post office and then later was converted to federal offices. It underwent extensive renovations a couple of years ago and its now looking great.
From Flickr:

This federal building in downtown Atlanta was constructed in an Art Deco style common to many WPA buildings of that era. The Modernistic style of the Federal architecture of this period has since become described as “starved classicism”. Originally, the building was used as a Post Office building. Also, it became the first federal building to be named ater the civil rights leader and is also located on a street named in honor of King. It underwent a renovation that was completed in 2011.
For more info: http://www.gsa.gov/portal/ext/html/site/hb/category/25431/actionParameter/exploreByBuilding/buildingId/799#

Martin Luther King Jr. Federal Building, Atlanta, GA
by Brent Moore

As I’ve mentioned here a couple of times, I’ll be talking about this blog at SoCon here in Atlanta, and with the event this weekend, I thought I’d switch off lamps and for a bit and switch onto some of Atlanta’s landmark Art Deco. That way, people can see what this blog is mostly about — buildings. (Although I still like lamps and furniture and staircases, he he.)

To start with, a grand 1930s building that’s just down the street from me. This building was originally built as a post office and then later was converted to federal offices. It underwent extensive renovations a couple of years ago and its now looking great.

From Flickr:

This federal building in downtown Atlanta was constructed in an Art Deco style common to many WPA buildings of that era. The Modernistic style of the Federal architecture of this period has since become described as “starved classicism”. Originally, the building was used as a Post Office building. Also, it became the first federal building to be named ater the civil rights leader and is also located on a street named in honor of King. It underwent a renovation that was completed in 2011.

For more info: http://www.gsa.gov/portal/ext/html/site/hb/category/25431/actionParameter/exploreByBuilding/buildingId/799#

Filed under mlk federal building martin luther king jr. federal building atlanta georgia downtown atlanta 1939 1930s art deco architecture exterior

12 notes &

Lightolier “Century” Series 3-Light Chandelier, c1939via Rejuvenation
This late 30s lamp resembles a space probe — or what people imagined a space probe would be like.
Here’s info on this vintage beauty:

Updating a family of fixtures that had been introduced in the mid-1930s, Lightolier’s “Century” series had a sleek Streamline profile and a clean, modern look that found great appeal just before the war. “Century Lightoliers make exquisite employment of that generous but tasteful use of color with modern decoration permits.” This example retains its original Toned White and Brass finish, and “sunset effect Colorama glass” (as well as a hidden switch in the rotating cone finial at the base of the body).

Price: $900. 

Lightolier “Century” Series 3-Light Chandelier, c1939
via Rejuvenation

This late 30s lamp resembles a space probe — or what people imagined a space probe would be like.

Here’s info on this vintage beauty:

Updating a family of fixtures that had been introduced in the mid-1930s, Lightolier’s “Century” series had a sleek Streamline profile and a clean, modern look that found great appeal just before the war. “Century Lightoliers make exquisite employment of that generous but tasteful use of color with modern decoration permits.” This example retains its original Toned White and Brass finish, and “sunset effect Colorama glass” (as well as a hidden switch in the rotating cone finial at the base of the body).

Price: $900. 

Filed under art deco streamline streamline moderne 1930s 1939 interior design vintage retro chandelier ceiling lamp lighting light fixture