Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

Posts tagged 1930s

84 notes &

U… United States
Chrysler Building, NYC, New YorkPhoto by Rex Maxmilian
For the “United States” photo, I went with a biggie and also a photo I hadn’t come across before — a stunning shot!
Here’s the background of the shot (from Jan. 2013), as given by the photographer on Flickr:

- - G O T H A M - -
After 2500 photos (up to this point) in 4 days in New York City, and after walking several miles with several pounds of gear, I was exhausted, (to put it mildly). Having just had dinner with my cousin on our last night there around 11:30pm, we were headed back to the hotel. It was very cold and very foggy out and I was really looking forward to four or five hours of sleep in a warm, comfy bed before cabbing it to the airport at 6am. I glanced down 42nd Street from Times Square just to get one last glimpse from far away of my all-time favorite NYC building…
The Chrysler Building!
 The night, the lights, the fog… it was just too magical to pass up—even after having shot it on two separate occasions earlier in the trip. Right then I knew, I would get very little sleep. So, back to the room to get my gear and off into the night I went…
I took around 300 photos between 12:30-2:30am. This particular one was right across the street (on 42nd) from Grand Central Station. Aside from a slight saturation bump and tone level adjustments, this is pretty much what it looked like S.O.O.C. (straight out of camera).
To me, I could just imagine Batman perched atop the building in the lower-right of the frame overlooking the city… hence naming the photo —GOTHAM—
 More to come!
…oh, and, HAPPY NEW YEAR !!!
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Gear used: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM with 2x III Extender, TripodSettings: 13 sec. exposure, f/11, ISO 50, 210mm, Mirror lockup, 2 sec. timer shutter releaseFile name: NYC 20130113-2629 (5D2_1122)Location: 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue, New York, New York, USA

U… United States

Chrysler Building, NYC, New York
Photo by Rex Maxmilian

For the “United States” photo, I went with a biggie and also a photo I hadn’t come across before — a stunning shot!

Here’s the background of the shot (from Jan. 2013), as given by the photographer on Flickr:

- - G O T H A M - -

After 2500 photos (up to this point) in 4 days in New York City, and after walking several miles with several pounds of gear, I was exhausted, (to put it mildly). Having just had dinner with my cousin on our last night there around 11:30pm, we were headed back to the hotel. It was very cold and very foggy out and I was really looking forward to four or five hours of sleep in a warm, comfy bed before cabbing it to the airport at 6am. I glanced down 42nd Street from Times Square just to get one last glimpse from far away of my all-time favorite NYC building…

The Chrysler Building!

 The night, the lights, the fog… it was just too magical to pass up—even after having shot it on two separate occasions earlier in the trip. Right then I knew, I would get very little sleep. So, back to the room to get my gear and off into the night I went…

I took around 300 photos between 12:30-2:30am. This particular one was right across the street (on 42nd) from Grand Central Station. Aside from a slight saturation bump and tone level adjustments, this is pretty much what it looked like S.O.O.C. (straight out of camera).

To me, I could just imagine Batman perched atop the building in the lower-right of the frame overlooking the city… hence naming the photo —GOTHAM—

 More to come!

…oh, and, HAPPY NEW YEAR !!!

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Gear used: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM with 2x III Extender, Tripod
Settings: 13 sec. exposure, f/11, ISO 50, 210mm, Mirror lockup, 2 sec. timer shutter release
File name: NYC 20130113-2629 (5D2_1122)
Location: 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue, New York, New York, USA

Filed under chrysler building nyc new york city manhattan photography architectural photography architecture art deco 1930s

37 notes &

T… Toronto
Relief, Toronto Stock Exchange, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaPhoto by Greg’s Southern Ontario
Awesome shot of a 1930s frieze. Click to access full size.
From Flickr:

… Streamline Moderne style frieze was designed by Charles Comfort in 1937 & depicts Canadian workers & industries represented by the stock exchange. Of special interest is the well suited stockbroker, depicted with his hand in the pocket of an oblivious common laborer, as if greedily taking what does not belong to him. This bas-relief was implemented during the Great Depression, when many in society shared overwhelming feelings of economic betrayal….

T… Toronto

Relief, Toronto Stock Exchange, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Photo by Greg’s Southern Ontario

Awesome shot of a 1930s frieze. Click to access full size.

From Flickr:

… Streamline Moderne style frieze was designed by Charles Comfort in 1937 & depicts Canadian workers & industries represented by the stock exchange. Of special interest is the well suited stockbroker, depicted with his hand in the pocket of an oblivious common laborer, as if greedily taking what does not belong to him. This bas-relief was implemented during the Great Depression, when many in society shared overwhelming feelings of economic betrayal….

Filed under toronto canada ontario toronto stock exchange streamline moderne frieze charles comfort 1930s great depression

174 notes &

S… Syracuse
Niagara Mohawk Building, Syracuse, New YorkPhoto by the National Register of Historic Places
Those of you familiar with this blog’s Facebook page know that an image from this building is the header — permanently — of the page. I love it so much I think if I ever am in Syracuse and reach it, I might kiss it. 
From the NRHP’s Flickr post:

The Niagara Hudson BuildingOther name: Niagara Mohawk BuildingSyracuse, Onondaga County, NY
The Niagara Hudson Building in Syracuse is an outstanding example of Art Deco architecture and a symbol of the Age of Electricity. Completed in 1932, the building became the headquarters for the nation’s largest electric utility company and expressed the technology of electricity through its modernistic design, material, and extraordinary program of exterior lighting. The design elements applied by architects Melvin L. King and Bley & Lyman transformed a corporate office tower into a widely admired beacon of light and belief in the future. With its central tower and figurative winged sculpture personifying electric lighting, the powerfully sculpted and decorated building offered a symbol of optimism and progress in the context of the Great Depression.

S… Syracuse

Niagara Mohawk Building, Syracuse, New York
Photo by the National Register of Historic Places

Those of you familiar with this blog’s Facebook page know that an image from this building is the header — permanently — of the page. I love it so much I think if I ever am in Syracuse and reach it, I might kiss it. 

From the NRHP’s Flickr post:

The Niagara Hudson Building
Other name: Niagara Mohawk Building
Syracuse, Onondaga County, NY

The Niagara Hudson Building in Syracuse is an outstanding example of Art Deco architecture and a symbol of the Age of Electricity. Completed in 1932, the building became the headquarters for the nation’s largest electric utility company and expressed the technology of electricity through its modernistic design, material, and extraordinary program of exterior lighting. The design elements applied by architects Melvin L. King and Bley & Lyman transformed a corporate office tower into a widely admired beacon of light and belief in the future. With its central tower and figurative winged sculpture personifying electric lighting, the powerfully sculpted and decorated building offered a symbol of optimism and progress in the context of the Great Depression.

Filed under niagara mohawk building syracuse new york new york state upstate new york art deco architecture 1930s classic niagara hudson building onondaga county electricity 1932 office building beautiful building

41 notes &

S… Saint Louis
Continental-Life Building, Saint Louis, MissouriPhoto by Bill Badzo
GREAT black and white image. 
Another image, same building, same artist (click here for large):

Building notes, from Flickr:

The Continental-Life Building, also known as the Continental Building, is an Art Deco skyscraper in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, which was completed in 1930. 
Commissioned by Edward Mays to be the home of his two businesses, Continental-Life Insurance and the Grand National Bank, the building was designed by William B. Ittner, a prominent St. Louis architect. It housed businesses through the mid-1960s, when its co-owners included St. Louis mayor Alfonso J. Cervantes, prominent St. Louis defense attorney Morris Shenker, and Harold Koplar of KPLR. At some point in the 1970s the building fell into disrepair.
After a few false starts in the late 1990s, St. Louis developers Pete Rothschild and Stephen Trampe took on the project, renovating the building into apartments. It reopened in 2001. The building has a connected three-story parking garage, which is used by both residents and patrons of the nearby Fox Theatre. The top of the parking garage holds an outdoor pool for residents’ use.
Architectural elements from the building were collected over time by the St. Louis Building Arts Foundation and returned to the building in the Stephen Trampe renovation.

S… Saint Louis

Continental-Life Building, Saint Louis, Missouri
Photo by Bill Badzo

GREAT black and white image. 

Another image, same building, same artist (click here for large):

Building notes, from Flickr:

The Continental-Life Building, also known as the Continental Building, is an Art Deco skyscraper in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, which was completed in 1930. 

Commissioned by Edward Mays to be the home of his two businesses, Continental-Life Insurance and the Grand National Bank, the building was designed by William B. Ittner, a prominent St. Louis architect. It housed businesses through the mid-1960s, when its co-owners included St. Louis mayor Alfonso J. Cervantes, prominent St. Louis defense attorney Morris Shenker, and Harold Koplar of KPLR. At some point in the 1970s the building fell into disrepair.

After a few false starts in the late 1990s, St. Louis developers Pete Rothschild and Stephen Trampe took on the project, renovating the building into apartments. It reopened in 2001. The building has a connected three-story parking garage, which is used by both residents and patrons of the nearby Fox Theatre. The top of the parking garage holds an outdoor pool for residents’ use.

Architectural elements from the building were collected over time by the St. Louis Building Arts Foundation and returned to the building in the Stephen Trampe renovation.

Filed under continental-life building continental building saint louis st. louis missouri skyscraper 1930s art deco architecture black and white bw 1930 william b. ittner