Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

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Boggs House, Boise, IdahoSubmitted by Dan Everhart (Preservation Idaho) 
A second snazzy single family in Boise.
Writes Dan:

Clarence and Flora Boggs House, 2422 W. State Street, Boise, Idaho
Built by Boggs for himself for $3,000.00 in 1938, the house incorporates all the hallmarks of the Streamline Moderne including “speed lines,” glass brick, and a porthole window (obscured by mature vegetation). The house features a split-level floor plan. 
Clarence Boggs was born in St. Francis, KS in 1887 and graduated from Washington State University in 1910. In 1935, he was listed as being a member of the Boise airport engineering committee and working as a designing engineer for Idaho Power where he specialized in air conditioning and home modernization. In 1925, Boggs first built and lived in the Spanish eclectic house next door before constructing his new home in 1938.

Boggs House, Boise, Idaho
Submitted by Dan Everhart (Preservation Idaho

A second snazzy single family in Boise.

Writes Dan:

Clarence and Flora Boggs House, 2422 W. State Street, Boise, Idaho

Built by Boggs for himself for $3,000.00 in 1938, the house incorporates all the hallmarks of the Streamline Moderne including “speed lines,” glass brick, and a porthole window (obscured by mature vegetation). The house features a split-level floor plan.

Clarence Boggs was born in St. Francis, KS in 1887 and graduated from Washington State University in 1910. In 1935, he was listed as being a member of the Boise airport engineering committee and working as a designing engineer for Idaho Power where he specialized in air conditioning and home modernization. In 1925, Boggs first built and lived in the Spanish eclectic house next door before constructing his new home in 1938.

Filed under 1930s architecture art moderne moderne streamline modern art deo glass brick glass block modernism modern architecture boise idaho 1938 submission

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