Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

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Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building (Demolished), Cleveland, Ohiofrom Library of Congress
One last pic from this photo survey, which looks sadly like an “urban exploration” foray.
And BTW, yes, the building was demolished just a few years ago, after standing vacant for decades.
From a Flickr post:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Courts Building was located at 1560 East Twenty-First (21st) Street, next to the Cleveland Police Department. The steel and concrete building was designed by Warner and Mitchell in the Art Deco style. The 13-story cut-back tower has a sandstone façade, while the remainder of the building is surfaced with light-colored brick. The Art Deco style was carried throughout the building’s interior and some of the light fixtures are on display at the Western Reserve Historical Society. The tower appears four-sided from the exterior, but within becomes an octagon, with a 3-story rotunda topped with a remarkable octagonal light which could be raised and lowered. Completed in 1931, the building housed courtrooms, offices for county officials and a 350 person jail, which was considered one of the most modern jail in the United States when it was built. With the construction of the new Criminal Courts Building in 1977, the building fell into disrepair. Attempts to repurpose the building for other county and local functions eventually failed and the building was demolished (sometime between 2008 and 2010) and is now the site of a large parking lot.

From LoC:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building is a fine example of the Art Deco Style as interpreted in Cleveland during the late 1920s and 1930s. The interior contained a restrained, but elegant octagonal entrance rotunda. The building housed both the criminal courts and a jail, with an ingenious circulation pattern that maintained maximum security at the same time that it permitted efficient transfer from one to the other. This building was the scene of a number of highly publicized trials, including that of the Marilyn Sheppard murder case in 1954.

Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building (Demolished), Cleveland, Ohio
from Library of Congress

One last pic from this photo survey, which looks sadly like an “urban exploration” foray.

And BTW, yes, the building was demolished just a few years ago, after standing vacant for decades.

From a Flickr post:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Courts Building was located at 1560 East Twenty-First (21st) Street, next to the Cleveland Police Department. The steel and concrete building was designed by Warner and Mitchell in the Art Deco style. The 13-story cut-back tower has a sandstone façade, while the remainder of the building is surfaced with light-colored brick. The Art Deco style was carried throughout the building’s interior and some of the light fixtures are on display at the Western Reserve Historical Society. The tower appears four-sided from the exterior, but within becomes an octagon, with a 3-story rotunda topped with a remarkable octagonal light which could be raised and lowered. Completed in 1931, the building housed courtrooms, offices for county officials and a 350 person jail, which was considered one of the most modern jail in the United States when it was built. With the construction of the new Criminal Courts Building in 1977, the building fell into disrepair. Attempts to repurpose the building for other county and local functions eventually failed and the building was demolished (sometime between 2008 and 2010) and is now the site of a large parking lot.

From LoC:

The Cuyahoga County Criminal Court Building is a fine example of the Art Deco Style as interpreted in Cleveland during the late 1920s and 1930s. The interior contained a restrained, but elegant octagonal entrance rotunda. The building housed both the criminal courts and a jail, with an ingenious circulation pattern that maintained maximum security at the same time that it permitted efficient transfer from one to the other. This building was the scene of a number of highly publicized trials, including that of the Marilyn Sheppard murder case in 1954.

Filed under cuyahoga county cuyahoga county criminal court building cleveland ohio 1920s 1930s abandoned building black and white demolished building historic preservation historic american buildings survey habs

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