Art Deco Architecture

The Old Modern - Then and Now

49 notes &

Detail, Jantzen Building, Portland, Oregonby Debra Jane Seltzer
Lovely detail of a diving woman.
From Seltzer’s web site, RoadsideArchitecture.com:

This Jantzen Building appears to be from the 1930s or so. It features their diving woman logo. Jantzen was a swimwear company. There is  another  Jantzen Building nearby that was built in 1930. Perhaps the company moved to this building or it maintained one for offices and the other for production?

Detail, Jantzen Building, Portland, Oregon
by Debra Jane Seltzer

Lovely detail of a diving woman.

From Seltzer’s web site, RoadsideArchitecture.com:

This Jantzen Building appears to be from the 1930s or so. It features their diving woman logo. Jantzen was a swimwear company. There is  another  Jantzen Building nearby that was built in 1930. Perhaps the company moved to this building or it maintained one for offices and the other for production?

Filed under art deco architecture 1930s architecture jantzen building jantzen portland oregeon swimming diving

59 notes &

The Blackstone, Portland, Oregonby soma_slim
Great Egyptian-style Deco in Portland, where I’m headed today. (And yes, coming up, Portland pics scoured from the Internet and then hopefully ones from my own camera.)
Info on this building, via Flickr:

This is 1831 SW Park Avenue, 6 blocks south of PAM and right in the centre of Portland State University.www.pdx.edu/housing/buildings-blackstone"This five-story building is located in the Park Blocks, just north of Millar Library, and was built in 1931. Located in the heart of campus, according to Portland State Housing Office, Blackstone residents can enjoy being in the center of everything from Portland’s Saturday Farmer’s Market to concerts and art fairs. I think it means it’s a "little" noisy sometimes."

The Blackstone, Portland, Oregon
by soma_slim

Great Egyptian-style Deco in Portland, where I’m headed today. (And yes, coming up, Portland pics scoured from the Internet and then hopefully ones from my own camera.)

Info on this building, via Flickr:

This is 1831 SW Park Avenue, 6 blocks south of PAM and right in the centre of Portland State University.

www.pdx.edu/housing/buildings-blackstone

"This five-story building is located in the Park Blocks, just north of Millar Library, and was built in 1931. Located in the heart of campus, according to Portland State Housing Office, Blackstone residents can enjoy being in the center of everything from Portland’s Saturday Farmer’s Market to concerts and art fairs. I think it means it’s a "little" noisy sometimes."

Filed under art deco architecture 1930s architecture portland oregeon the blackstone egyptian deco

26 notes &

Bloomingdales, NYC, NYBloomberg photo via Haaretz
From a “This Day in Jewish History” story recounting the history of Bloomingdales, including its eponymous founder, Lyman Bloomingdale:

Bloomingdales moved to the block where it sits now, at 59th St. between Third and Lexington in 1886, although the current flagship building with its Art Deco façade and Lexington Ave. entrance, only opened in 1930. By then, both Lyman and Joseph were gone (Joseph had retired in 1896), and their family had sold the store – although not the real estate on which it sat – to the Federated Department Stores consortium, which also included A&S and Filene’s, among others. The year before, 1929, sales at Bloomingdales reached $23 million.

Bloomingdales, NYC, NY
Bloomberg photo via Haaretz

From a “This Day in Jewish History” story recounting the history of Bloomingdales, including its eponymous founder, Lyman Bloomingdale:

Bloomingdales moved to the block where it sits now, at 59th St. between Third and Lexington in 1886, although the current flagship building with its Art Deco façade and Lexington Ave. entrance, only opened in 1930. By then, both Lyman and Joseph were gone (Joseph had retired in 1896), and their family had sold the store – although not the real estate on which it sat – to the Federated Department Stores consortium, which also included A&S and Filene’s, among others. The year before, 1929, sales at Bloomingdales reached $23 million.

Filed under bloomingdales department store nyc history new york city history new york history art deco architecture facade

17 notes &

Outside the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, Englandvia Richard Ponter, Scarborough News
From a preview of Deco Days coming up the weekend of Oct. 31: 

Gothic glamour is this year’s theme in the annual art deco-inspired festivities at the Stephen Joseph Theatre.
In celebration of its 1936 Odeon building, the theatre is inviting the public to a packed Deco Days event on October 31 and November 1.
Across the two days there’s everything from free architectural tours of the building to clutch bag design and hair and make-up workshops, musical entertainment, a chance to see some iconic monsters from the golden age of horror and to have a spot of cream tea.
The staff are getting in on the act too; ushers will provide a period welcome dressed in original 1930s outfits. Visitors are also welcome to dress for the occasion.
[more]

Outside the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, England
via Richard Ponter, Scarborough News

From a preview of Deco Days coming up the weekend of Oct. 31: 

Gothic glamour is this year’s theme in the annual art deco-inspired festivities at the Stephen Joseph Theatre.

In celebration of its 1936 Odeon building, the theatre is inviting the public to a packed Deco Days event on October 31 and November 1.

Across the two days there’s everything from free architectural tours of the building to clutch bag design and hair and make-up workshops, musical entertainment, a chance to see some iconic monsters from the golden age of horror and to have a spot of cream tea.

The staff are getting in on the act too; ushers will provide a period welcome dressed in original 1930s outfits. Visitors are also welcome to dress for the occasion.

[more]

Filed under art deco deco days scarborough stephen joseph theatre odeon cinema 1930s fashion

19 notes &

Port Columbus Control Tower, Columbus, Ohiovia Columbus Monthly
From an article on “Secret Columbus,” a threatened treasure in plain sight.

On July 8, 1929, the first transcontinental air-rail voyage stopped in Columbus. Henry Ford spoke at a dedication ceremony held just after passengers, including Amelia Earhart, took off on the second leg of their cross-country journey. The place where they celebrated still stands today—near North Hamilton Road on the fringe of the modern-day airport—though it’s threatened by age and decay. The original Port Columbus control tower, built in 1920, claimed the unenviable No. 1 spot on the Columbus Landmarks Foundation’s list of most endangered buildings earlier this year. The tower has been empty for years and is becoming unsafe, says Angie Tabor, a spokeswoman for the Columbus Regional Airport Authority, which owns the control tower. columbuslandmarks.org

Port Columbus Control Tower, Columbus, Ohio
via Columbus Monthly

From an article on “Secret Columbus,” a threatened treasure in plain sight.

On July 8, 1929, the first transcontinental air-rail voyage stopped in Columbus. Henry Ford spoke at a dedication ceremony held just after passengers, including Amelia Earhart, took off on the second leg of their cross-country journey. The place where they celebrated still stands today—near North Hamilton Road on the fringe of the modern-day airport—though it’s threatened by age and decay. The original Port Columbus control tower, built in 1920, claimed the unenviable No. 1 spot on the Columbus Landmarks Foundation’s list of most endangered buildings earlier this year. The tower has been empty for years and is becoming unsafe, says Angie Tabor, a spokeswoman for the Columbus Regional Airport Authority, which owns the control tower. columbuslandmarks.org

Filed under art deco architecture 1920s architecture port columbus port columbus control tower aviation history aviation historic preservation

40 notes &

Serralves Villa, Porto, Portugalvia Carlos Vilela, Forbes Life
Occasionally I find examples of Art Deco in Portugal but this is a new one. As the article says, relatively unknown.
From Forbes Life:

Located on a sprawling 45 acres in west Porto, Portugal, the Serralves Foundation may not have the same name recognition as the Tate Modern in London, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, or Centre Pompidou in Paris, but it should have it. The foundation, established 25 years ago, began with a deposit from the secretary of state of culture with a mission to raise the general public’s awareness of contemporary art. When the state acquired the property in 1986, the Art Deco Serralves Villa, formerly the home of a count, along with its massive surrounding gardens, were already on its grounds. A decade later, the Serralves Museum, designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Álvaro Siza, was built on the grounds. This year celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Serralves Foundation and the 15th anniversary of Serralves Museum. It has grown to be Portugal’s most visited museum, with over 300,000 visitors annually.

Serralves Villa, Porto, Portugal
via Carlos Vilela, Forbes Life

Occasionally I find examples of Art Deco in Portugal but this is a new one. As the article says, relatively unknown.

From Forbes Life:

Located on a sprawling 45 acres in west Porto, Portugal, the Serralves Foundation may not have the same name recognition as the Tate Modern in London, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, or Centre Pompidou in Paris, but it should have it. The foundation, established 25 years ago, began with a deposit from the secretary of state of culture with a mission to raise the general public’s awareness of contemporary art. When the state acquired the property in 1986, the Art Deco Serralves Villa, formerly the home of a count, along with its massive surrounding gardens, were already on its grounds. A decade later, the Serralves Museum, designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Álvaro Siza, was built on the grounds. This year celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Serralves Foundation and the 15th anniversary of Serralves Museum. It has grown to be Portugal’s most visited museum, with over 300,000 visitors annually.

Filed under serralves foundation serralves villa art deco architecture 1930s architecture porto portugal serralves museum

3 notes &

Feds continue to sift options for vacant Dillon Courthouse

In other Buffalo news, federal officials continue to review bids for the now-vacant Michael J. Dillon Courthouse. I don’t even remember seeing this but there’s a lot of architecture to absorb in that area. The building dates to 1936, was dedicated to FDR, and and is managed by the General Services Administration. -Wendy 

Filed under art deco architecture historic preservation buffalo downtown buffalo dillon courthouse courthouse

47 notes &

Buffalo Central Terminal, Buffalo, New Yorkvia The Guardian
Great, if depressing, article from The Guardian exploring the east side of Buffalo, NY. I had the pleasure of visiting the city a year ago and in fact did visit this area, which as described looks like a bomb went off a couple decades ago. I took the bus over and would’ve taken pictures beyond the station, but I didn’t feel safe whipping out a camera while walking around on my own. (Not easily creeped out by anything but yeah, not a good idea.) There is still a lot of great architecture hanging in there. (And a ton in other, wealthier areas.) -Wendy  
From the article, "The Tour de Neglect: a cycle ride through Buffalo’s deprived East Side":

The city of Buffalo has an identity problem. One half has been reborn like a phoenix from a graveyard of industrial ash – experiencing an economic and cultural resurgence that has transformed many previously barren areas into bustling centres of commerce and entertainment. Yet the other half sits in a state of utter disrepair – its streets manifest a palpable level of poverty, blind to the recovery and optimism growing across town. 
“It’s a true tale of two cities,” said blogger and photographer David Torke, who created the Tour de Neglect. “You have the more prosperous and emerging West Side contrasted with the East Side, which has been neglected on all sorts of levels for decades.”
Torke uses his fixBuffalo blog to catalogue the structural devastation which plagues Buffalo’s East Side. Eight years ago, Torke decided that his blog was too detached from readers stuck in front of a computer screen – and the Tour de Neglect was born. It is now an annual event…
…As the tour cycled on, the magnificence of the Buffalo Central Terminal’s 17-storey clock tower loomed over Memorial Drive. The bravura of the art deco architecture has landed the terminal the unofficial title of “Buffalo’s best-loved building”.
Opened in 1929, the train station handled crowds of passengers during the height of Buffalo’s prosperity as part of New York Central Railroad’s mainline to Penn Station. The terminal was envisioned as the centre of a new downtown area, but the proposal went wayward when the 1929 stock market crash hit the New York Central Railroad. Passenger rail travel fell steadily with the arrival of the car and planes, and the last passenger train rolled out of the Buffalo Central Terminal in 1979. It has now been vacant for almost as long as it was in use.
From the terminal’s front entrance you can make out the top of the Key Centre’s pyramidal rooftop, located in the heart of downtown Buffalo. There is perhaps no better spot in the city to see the disparity between the East Side and the rest of town.
After a series of ill-conceived schemes by private owners, the 18-acre site was acquired in 1997 by the non-profit Central Terminal Restoration Corporation for a nominal $1. The Buffalo Central Terminal is undoubtedly a marvel, but it’s also the closest thing imaginable to a time warp for Buffalonians: the ticket booths remain vacant; the refurbished information clock kiosk casts a faint pale light on the marble floor; the passenger concourse is now nothing more than the rusted remains of a railroad track that has been waiting decades for the sound of a train whistle. It’s eerie to think of the vibrancy of the terminal’s grand foyer in the 1920s, compared with the silence and emptiness of today.
While Buffalo’s Dyngus Day celebrations and other small fundraising events take place within the complex, the building is still very much underused. Recent progress has stalled with the Restoration Corporation’s split on whether to retain it as a DIY, project-based space, or whether to develop and expand the site into a true gateway to the city. Plans in the pipeline include an expansion of a commuter light rail system (connecting the Buffalo International Airport, Walden Galleria, Buffalo Central Terminal and the downtown business core), and incorporation of a potential high-speed rail link to New York City.

Buffalo Central Terminal, Buffalo, New York
via The Guardian

Great, if depressing, article from The Guardian exploring the east side of Buffalo, NY. I had the pleasure of visiting the city a year ago and in fact did visit this area, which as described looks like a bomb went off a couple decades ago. I took the bus over and would’ve taken pictures beyond the station, but I didn’t feel safe whipping out a camera while walking around on my own. (Not easily creeped out by anything but yeah, not a good idea.) There is still a lot of great architecture hanging in there. (And a ton in other, wealthier areas.) -Wendy  

From the article, "The Tour de Neglect: a cycle ride through Buffalo’s deprived East Side":

The city of Buffalo has an identity problem. One half has been reborn like a phoenix from a graveyard of industrial ash – experiencing an economic and cultural resurgence that has transformed many previously barren areas into bustling centres of commerce and entertainment. Yet the other half sits in a state of utter disrepair – its streets manifest a palpable level of poverty, blind to the recovery and optimism growing across town. 

“It’s a true tale of two cities,” said blogger and photographer David Torke, who created the Tour de Neglect. “You have the more prosperous and emerging West Side contrasted with the East Side, which has been neglected on all sorts of levels for decades.”

Torke uses his fixBuffalo blog to catalogue the structural devastation which plagues Buffalo’s East Side. Eight years ago, Torke decided that his blog was too detached from readers stuck in front of a computer screen – and the Tour de Neglect was born. It is now an annual event…

…As the tour cycled on, the magnificence of the Buffalo Central Terminal’s 17-storey clock tower loomed over Memorial Drive. The bravura of the art deco architecture has landed the terminal the unofficial title of “Buffalo’s best-loved building”.

Opened in 1929, the train station handled crowds of passengers during the height of Buffalo’s prosperity as part of New York Central Railroad’s mainline to Penn Station. The terminal was envisioned as the centre of a new downtown area, but the proposal went wayward when the 1929 stock market crash hit the New York Central Railroad. Passenger rail travel fell steadily with the arrival of the car and planes, and the last passenger train rolled out of the Buffalo Central Terminal in 1979. It has now been vacant for almost as long as it was in use.

From the terminal’s front entrance you can make out the top of the Key Centre’s pyramidal rooftop, located in the heart of downtown Buffalo. There is perhaps no better spot in the city to see the disparity between the East Side and the rest of town.

After a series of ill-conceived schemes by private owners, the 18-acre site was acquired in 1997 by the non-profit Central Terminal Restoration Corporation for a nominal $1. The Buffalo Central Terminal is undoubtedly a marvel, but it’s also the closest thing imaginable to a time warp for Buffalonians: the ticket booths remain vacant; the refurbished information clock kiosk casts a faint pale light on the marble floor; the passenger concourse is now nothing more than the rusted remains of a railroad track that has been waiting decades for the sound of a train whistle. It’s eerie to think of the vibrancy of the terminal’s grand foyer in the 1920s, compared with the silence and emptiness of today.

While Buffalo’s Dyngus Day celebrations and other small fundraising events take place within the complex, the building is still very much underused. Recent progress has stalled with the Restoration Corporation’s split on whether to retain it as a DIY, project-based space, or whether to develop and expand the site into a true gateway to the city. Plans in the pipeline include an expansion of a commuter light rail system (connecting the Buffalo International Airport, Walden Galleria, Buffalo Central Terminal and the downtown business core), and incorporation of a potential high-speed rail link to New York City.

Filed under buffalo central terminal buffalo urban decay art deco abandoned abandoned buildings poverty rust belt

9 notes &

$2 million donation enables Criterion Theatre in Bar Harbor to reopen

I was in Bar Harbor last year and can affirm that it has some quite charming architecture. Here’s a nice story out of there.

From the Bangor Daily News:

With hopes of improving the property’s physical condition and restoring its cultural significance, a nonprofit group purchased the historic Criterion Theatre.

The Bar Harbor Jazz Festival purchased the Cottage Street art deco theater, built in 1932, from Erin Early Ward, according to Michael Boland, president of the festival’s board. Boland, who co-owned the theater as a private business, said Monday in an email the sale price was $1.2 million.

The purchase of the theater was made possible by a $2 million dollar donation from a local summer resident who Boland did not identify. He indicated the donation, made specifically for the acquisition of the 877-seat theater, enabled the festival to purchase the property outright, without incurring any debt, and to have some money leftover to hire staff, make repairs and create a small endowment.

[more]

Filed under bar harbor maine criterion theatre historic preservation historic theater 1930s architecture

21 notes &

Mr. Smith’s, Warrington, England, U.K.via Warrington-Worldwide
In less depressing U.K. preservation news, a historic cinema building in Warrington (btw. Manchester and Liverpool) has been saved.
From Warrington-Worldwide:

Warrington’s iconic Mr Smith’s nightclub has now officially been saved from the bulldozers and will be transformed into a Youth Zone - and a new home for Warrington Youth Club.
Warrington Borough Council’s Executive Board last night (Monday) unanimously approved a £3 million capital investment to help renovate the building and get the facility up and running.
The building’s owners the Pervaiz Naviede Family Trust have confirmed the sale of the building for £1.2 million to the Newton-le-Willows based Vimto drinks company who will donate the building back to the community on a 125 year lease deal, involving a peppercorn ren*…
Mr Smith’s was formerly the Ritz and then the ABC cinema before it shot to fame in the 1980s, attracting large numbers of revellers each week.
More recently, it had short openings as Synergy and Halo nightclubs in the late 2000s but never attracted the same numbers to make it a viable business.
Warrington council failed in an attempt to buy the building in 2011 when it wanted to include the site in its plans to improve the waterfront area next to the Mersey.
They council was prepared to pay around £500,000 for the building at the time which eventually went for in the region of £1 million.
The building opened in August 1937 as a 1,928 seat cinema and the first film starred Robert Armstrong Without Orders and Chester Morris “I promise to pay.”

* Curious, what is a “peppercorn ren”? -Wendy

Mr. Smith’s, Warrington, England, U.K.
via Warrington-Worldwide

In less depressing U.K. preservation news, a historic cinema building in Warrington (btw. Manchester and Liverpool) has been saved.

From Warrington-Worldwide:

Warrington’s iconic Mr Smith’s nightclub has now officially been saved from the bulldozers and will be transformed into a Youth Zone - and a new home for Warrington Youth Club.

Warrington Borough Council’s Executive Board last night (Monday) unanimously approved a £3 million capital investment to help renovate the building and get the facility up and running.

The building’s owners the Pervaiz Naviede Family Trust have confirmed the sale of the building for £1.2 million to the Newton-le-Willows based Vimto drinks company who will donate the building back to the community on a 125 year lease deal, involving a peppercorn ren*…

Mr Smith’s was formerly the Ritz and then the ABC cinema before it shot to fame in the 1980s, attracting large numbers of revellers each week.

More recently, it had short openings as Synergy and Halo nightclubs in the late 2000s but never attracted the same numbers to make it a viable business.

Warrington council failed in an attempt to buy the building in 2011 when it wanted to include the site in its plans to improve the waterfront area next to the Mersey.

They council was prepared to pay around £500,000 for the building at the time which eventually went for in the region of £1 million.

The building opened in August 1937 as a 1,928 seat cinema and the first film starred Robert Armstrong Without Orders and Chester Morris “I promise to pay.”

* Curious, what is a “peppercorn ren”? -Wendy

Filed under art deco architecture historic preservation warrington england mr. smith's cinema